Topic: Blantyre

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  • In Pictures Two wheels can take you far

    An Afghan boy pushed a bicycle for his brother in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday. Cycling is growing in popularity in Afghanistan despite harsh conditions at times and a lack of parts or supplies to make repairs. The Afghanistan Cycling Federation, which started as a three person team, has grown to more than 40 men and women that train three times a week in Kabul. A relief organization, Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for Rehabilitation and Recreation, created in 1995 promotes cycling as a means of mobility, income and survival for those who have been victims of mine accidents.

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  • Mixed reactions over Malawi's plan to repeal anti-gay law

    Repealing a colonial-era ban on homosexuality may please foreign donors, intent on protecting democratic rights of minorities. But it causes a stir among churches and conservative Malawians.

  • Amid riots, Malawi's president issues harsh warning to opposition

    Amid riots, Malawi's president issues harsh warning to opposition

    A day after he called for peaceful dialogue with protesters, President Mutharika warned that he will 'smoke out' the opposition figures who he suspects are behind the violence.

  • Despite threats, Malawi protesters rally against high prices, corruption

    Despite threats, Malawi protesters rally against high prices, corruption

    Like those in North Africa, nationwide protests in Malawi have been sparked by discontent over higher food and fuel prices, as well as concerns that the government is becoming increasingly authoritarian.

  • After South Africa's World Cup, xenophobic threats on the rise

    After South Africa's World Cup, xenophobic threats on the rise

    South Africa hosted a successful World Cup, but now many citizens are stepping up threats against migrant workers from other African countries. Will there be a repeat of deadly riots of 2008? One employer is building an 'asylum.'

  • In Pictures Two wheels can take you far

    An Afghan boy pushed a bicycle for his brother in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday. Cycling is growing in popularity in Afghanistan despite harsh conditions at times and a lack of parts or supplies to make repairs. The Afghanistan Cycling Federation, which started as a three person team, has grown to more than 40 men and women that train three times a week in Kabul. A relief organization, Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for Rehabilitation and Recreation, created in 1995 promotes cycling as a means of mobility, income and survival for those who have been victims of mine accidents.

  • Madonna and another Malawi child?

    Madonna and another Malawi child?

    Do international adoptions offer better lives for orphans? Judge delays ruling on pop singer's adoption application until Friday.

  • For Malawi girls, high school is only the first hurdle

    For Malawi girls, high school is only the first hurdle

    A small group of girls funded largely by Monitor readers aims to make the most of their opportunity.