Topic: Bill Bradley

Featured

  • Top 10 sports biographies I wish somebody would write

    Top 10 sports biographies I wish somebody would write

    Call this a wish list to publishers. Of course it's true that’s there hardly any major sports star who hasn’t already achieved hardcover immortality a time or two or more. So why check back in with some already familiar sports luminaries? With the passage of time comes fresh perspectives on playing days, teammates, and rivals. And maybe even a little more honesty. So here goes, in no particular order: the Monitor’s Top 10 sports figures we’d put in the publishing on-deck circle.

All Content

  • Cory Booker the favorite for NJ Senate seat, but still has a race to win

    The death of US Senator Frank Lautenberg has set off a scramble to fill the seat via a primary election in August and a special election in October. On Saturday, Newark Mayor Cory Booker entered the race.

  • Tax VOX Corporate tax reform is more complicated than politicians think

    Corporate tax reform is not a bad idea, Gleckman writes, but it may be harder than either President Obama or key Republicans want to admit.

  • Opinion 'Fiscal cliff' or not, tax reform is easier said than done

    As part of any deal on the 'fiscal cliff,' Congress will likely take up comprehensive tax reform. That's a worthy goal, but it will involve more political and economic pain than most would like to admit. Every line in the tax code has its own constituency and rationale.

  • Reader recommendation: We Can All Do Better

    Monitor readers share their favorite book picks.

  • Over Time

    Deford's new memoir captures his polished crustiness.

  • Vietnam War: Beginning 13 years of commemorating a divisive conflict

    At the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Monday, President Obama began a national commemoration of the 50-year anniversary of the Vietnam War. To Vietnam veterans he said, 'You made us proud, and you have earned your place among the greatest generations.'

  • Top 10 sports biographies I wish somebody would write

    Top 10 sports biographies I wish somebody would write

    Call this a wish list to publishers. Of course it's true that’s there hardly any major sports star who hasn’t already achieved hardcover immortality a time or two or more. So why check back in with some already familiar sports luminaries? With the passage of time comes fresh perspectives on playing days, teammates, and rivals. And maybe even a little more honesty. So here goes, in no particular order: the Monitor’s Top 10 sports figures we’d put in the publishing on-deck circle.

  • Tax reform is  essential, inevitable, and impossible

    Tax VOX Tax reform is essential, inevitable, and impossible

    Tax reform is even more necessary now than it was in 1986. Everyone agrees that the tax system is complex, unfair, and inefficient.

  • In Pictures Athletes turned politicians

    Imran Khan was one of cricket's best ever all-rounders, captaining Pakistan to victory in the 1992 World Cup. He founded the political party Movement for Justice and was a member of the National Assembly from November 2002 to October 2007, when he resigned and was put under house arrest by then-President Pervez Musharraf.

  • Political misquotes: The 10 most famous things never actually said

    Political misquotes: The 10 most famous things never actually said

    Captain Kirk never said "Beam me up, Scotty!" Ilsa Laszlow never said, "Play it again, Sam," and Sherlock Holmes never said, "Elementary, my dear Watson." But these misquotes remain firmly lodged in the public consciousness, even though they appear nowhere in the original works. The same is true for things "said" – that is, widely attributed to, but not actually said – by political figures. Sometimes a misquote is cooked up by opponents or parodists as a way of discrediting or mocking the figure. Sometimes a line is attributed to a widely admired person as a way of making it sound more authoritative, like when someone co-signs a loan. And sometimes it's just a mistake. Here are 10 of the most widely believed – but completely bogus – things ever "said" by political figures.