Topic: Archduke Franz Ferdinand

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  • American moms: What makes a mom in the US? Take our quiz

    Mother's Day began on May 10, 1908, as the project of Anna Jarvis. Observed only in Grafton, W. Va., and Philadelphia at first, Ms. Jarvis asked Congress to set aside a day to honor mothers. It took four years, but finally in 1914, little over a month before Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Mother's Day proclamation on May 14. What made a mom then is certainly different than what makes a mom now. In the pursuit of understanding who our mothers are in America today — their age, their marital status, how many babies they have — take our quiz and expand your understanding of the American Mom. 

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  • History divides Bosnia once again, this time over World War I centenary (+video)

    Officials of Bosnia's two regions disagree over how to view the man who assassinated Archduke Ferdinand. One young worker observed that Bosnians have enough current-day problems to worry about without fighting over history.

  • The Monitor's View Freedom days

    Remembering D-Day, World War I, the Polish elections, Tiananmen Square. What do they have in common? A love of freedom.

  • The Harlem Hellfighters

    In graphic novel form, 'World War Z' author Max Brooks tells the story of the 369th Regiment, the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.

  • The War That Ended Peace

    Why did World War I begin? Historian Margaret MacMillan offers a masterly exploration of the factors that led to the devastating conflict.

  • American moms: What makes a mom in the US? Take our quiz

    Mother's Day began on May 10, 1908, as the project of Anna Jarvis. Observed only in Grafton, W. Va., and Philadelphia at first, Ms. Jarvis asked Congress to set aside a day to honor mothers. It took four years, but finally in 1914, little over a month before Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Mother's Day proclamation on May 14. What made a mom then is certainly different than what makes a mom now. In the pursuit of understanding who our mothers are in America today — their age, their marital status, how many babies they have — take our quiz and expand your understanding of the American Mom. 

  • Opinion Election day: Most predictions of the next four years will be wrong (+video)

    As President Obama or Mitt Romney will discover, the only predictable thing about foreign and domestic events is unpredictability. Woodrow Wilson didn't foresee World War I. Jimmy Carter called Iran an 'island of stability.' Terrorism got only brief mention in the 2000 Bush-Gore debates.