Topic: Arabian Peninsula

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  • Yemen's president may step down

    Yemen's president may step down

    President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced Saturday that he would step down within 30 days in exchange for immunity from prosecution and other conditions, but the deal remains fragile.

  • Why Obama isn't pushing for Yemen president to go: Al Qaeda

    Why Obama isn't pushing for Yemen president to go: Al Qaeda

    Obama wants Libya's Qaddafi out, and he pushed hard for Egypt's Mubarak to exit. Not so Yemen's Saleh, president for 33 years. The difference: US concern about Al Qaeda on the Arabian Peninsula.

  • Yemen: six 'facts' to question

    Opinion Yemen: six 'facts' to question

    With Yemen in upheaval, US pundits have peddled inflated fears about the threat it poses. While it’s easy to identify risk factors, circumstances don’t spell the kind of chaos Americans most fear, nor do they validate US support for President Ali Abdullah Saleh. His unpopular government has little moral or logistical ground to stand on. After a violent government crackdown on protesters Friday, three key military leaders have defected to the opposition, in addition to numerous other diplomats and lawmakers. But this doesn’t necessarily spell a victory for democracy. Sheila Carapico, a professor of political science and international relations at The University of Richmond and American University in Cairo debunks six claims about the tumult in Yemen.

  • The Monitor's View Yemen will be the big test for democracy vs. Al Qaeda

    The Yemen protests are working. Ali Abdullah Saleh is likely on the way out. But a democracy in Yemen will be up against the terrorist group's vision of violence.

  • Why Bahrain is unlikely to turn into an Iran-Saudi battleground

    Why Bahrain is unlikely to turn into an Iran-Saudi battleground

    The intervention of Saudi forces has escalated tensions between Bahrain's protesters and the country's Sunni rulers, leaving at least one dead and drawing criticism from Iran.

  • Day of Rage in Saudi Arabia: How much change can the Gulf expect?

    Day of Rage in Saudi Arabia: How much change can the Gulf expect?

    Regime change may not come swiftly to Gulf countries such as Saudi Arabia, where protesters have called for a 'Day of Rage' today, but a revolution of a different sort is taking place.

  • In Oman, protests spur timid media to cover the news

    In Oman, protests spur timid media to cover the news

    For a conservative country, where media self-censorship is routine and people keep their opinions to themselves, the news coverage highlights how quickly change is coming to Oman.

  • How Mideast turmoil affects oil prices. Six questions answered

    How Mideast turmoil affects oil prices. Six questions answered

    From the first spark of Middle East unrest in Tunisia in December until the violent suppression of protests in Libya in late February, the price of a barrel of crude oil rose from $88 a barrel to more than $100. But rising demand – from oil-hungry China and other fast-growing nations – was pushing prices up even before the turmoil. How much prices rise depends largely on whether supplies flow unimpeded from the Middle East. Here’s a rundown on oil supply-price issues affecting the US.

  • Prince William and Kate Middleton royal wedding: Do monarchies still matter?

    Prince William and Kate Middleton royal wedding: Do monarchies still matter?

    Prince William and Kate Middleton's royal wedding may have tinges of the turreted-castle fairy tale. But from romantic to ruthless, more than 40 modern monarchies, including Prince William's family, still influence global realities for better or worse.

  • Bahrain emerging as flashpoint in Middle East unrest

    Bahrain emerging as flashpoint in Middle East unrest

    The kingdom of Bahrain, a key base for US military operations in the region, faces its third straight day of protests as Sunnis and Shiites unite to demand political reform.