Topic: American Airlines Flight 11

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

All Content

  • Final 9/11 airplane lawsuit settles: American pays $135M 9/11 settlement

    9/11 lawsuit: American Airlines and insurance carriers will pay $135 million to financial services firm Cantor Fitzgerald, which lost two-thirds of its employees in the Sept. 11 attacks.

  • Steel relics in place as 9/11 museum nears completion (+video)

    The National September 11 Memorial & Museum is nearly complete, with mangled steel removed from the World Trade Center towers on display, along with a staircase used by survivors to escape one of the towers.

  • Pakistan arrests French Al Qaeda leader amid turmoil with prime minister

    The arrest of a French national, reportedly linked to the 9/11 mastermind, highlights the challenges Pakistan is facing as it tries to pull itself out of a deepening political crisis. 

  • How 9/11 looked from the air-traffic control center that saw it coming

    How 9/11 looked from the air-traffic control center that saw it coming

    The air-traffic controllers in 'Boston Center' – the facility that oversaw Flight 11 – speak of what happened on 9/11, from the confusion of the first moments to the frustration that military jets could not get to New York City faster.

  • The day America changed

    A timeline of events on September 11, 2001 and beyond.

  • Newly released audio shows the shock, confusion of September 11, 2001

    As 10-year commemorations of 9/11 get under way, the public now has access to a number of previously unreleased audio recordings from the morning of September 11, 2001.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • 9/11 flight numbers brought out of retirement by mistake

    9/11 flight numbers brought out of retirement by mistake

    9/11 flight numbers 93 and 175 were accidentally used for two Continental Airlines flights. United apologized but would not explain how the error happened.

  • 9/11 – still a call for comfort

    A Christian Science perspective.