Topic: American University in Cairo

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  • IMF gives Egypt $3 billion loan. Is it enough?

    IMF gives Egypt $3 billion loan. Is it enough?

    Egypt's $3 billion IMF loan will buy time for a government whose finances are wracked by investor fears and political upheaval. Tourism was down 46 percent in the first quarter of 2011.

  • Opinion Amid Arab Spring fires, why isn't Lebanon in flames?

    While its neighbors are in turmoil, Lebanon has endured with relative calm throughout this Arab Spring. What's Lebanon's secret?

  • Egypt sentences first Mubarak-era official in push for justice

    Egypt sentences first Mubarak-era official in push for justice

    Former Interior Minister Habib El Adly was given 12 years in prison today and fined $2.5 million for corruption, signaling that Egypt's military rulers are serious about prosecuting former officials.

  • Egypt erases history: 5 places where the Mubarak name will be removed

    Egypt erases history: 5 places where the Mubarak name will be removed

    An Egyptian court on April 21 ordered the physical removal of the Mubarak family name from all public places, formalizing a process that protesters began months ago. With Hosni Mubarak's name and face plastered on everything from street signs to stadiums to train stations, it will take a long time for the state to fully remove his mark. Here are a few of places to be scrubbed of the Mubarak moniker:

  • Mubarak and sons' detention a victory for Egypt's opposition

    Mubarak and sons' detention a victory for Egypt's opposition

    Mubarak is under questioning and he and his two sons are being transferred to a Cairo prison. Egypt's military rulers appear to be responding to escalating public pressure to see the former president behind bars.

  • Yemen: six 'facts' to question

    Opinion Yemen: six 'facts' to question

    With Yemen in upheaval, US pundits have peddled inflated fears about the threat it poses. While it’s easy to identify risk factors, circumstances don’t spell the kind of chaos Americans most fear, nor do they validate US support for President Ali Abdullah Saleh. His unpopular government has little moral or logistical ground to stand on. After a violent government crackdown on protesters Friday, three key military leaders have defected to the opposition, in addition to numerous other diplomats and lawmakers. But this doesn’t necessarily spell a victory for democracy. Sheila Carapico, a professor of political science and international relations at The University of Richmond and American University in Cairo debunks six claims about the tumult in Yemen.

  • In Egypt's Tahrir Square, women attacked at rally on International Women's Day

    In Egypt's Tahrir Square, women attacked at rally on International Women's Day

    After helping to overthrow Mubarak, Egyptian women – and some men – demonstrated today in favor of giving women more of a voice in building Egypt's future.

  • On International Women's Day, Egyptian women demand revolutionary role

    On International Women's Day, Egyptian women demand revolutionary role

    Egyptian women are staging a 'Million Woman March' today after the new prime minister appointed only one woman to his cabinet, raising fears that women will be shut out of building a new Egypt.

  • How Egypt's protesters will change US ties

    How Egypt's protesters will change US ties

    The new Egypt is likely to emerge as more independent, diverging from US wishes in certain areas – such as reaching out to Iran. But the allies still have long-term common interests.

  • Opinion I was born again on #Jan25. So was Egypt.

    I am only 22 years old, and Hosni Mubarak ruled Egypt with an iron fist for my entire life. But during the protests, I saw a new Egypt emerging – my Egypt. Men didn’t deal with me as a woman but as a fellow citizen. In place of the normal class and religious divisions, I only saw acceptance.