Topic: Amelia Newcomb

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • Editor's Blog What's North Korea thinking? Ask the Monitor

  • Japan quietly seeks global leadership niches

    Japan quietly seeks global leadership niches

    The island nation seeks to carve out a bigger role in world affairs as a 'soft power.'

  • Reporters on the Job

    Reporters on the Job

  • Japan as ground zero for no-waste lifestyle

    Japan as ground zero for no-waste lifestyle

    Three environmental models: Toyota's Prius factory, an electronics recycler, and a village that recycles 80 percent of its trash.

  • Reporters on the Job

    Reporters on the Job

  • From Japanese blogger to global novelist

  • Japan cracking US pop culture hegemony

    Japan cracking US pop culture hegemony

    Japan is quietly emerging as a global trendsetter in pop culture, as well as in green technology and environmental practices.

  • Reporters on the Job

    Reporters on the Job

  • Brief history of Japan’s culture of techno-toilets

    Brief history of Japan’s culture of techno-toilets

    Hotels in Japan now advertise high-tech seats, the way wireless Internet is touted in the US.