Topic: Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building

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  • Home sales down. But six cities defy housing gloom.

    Home sales down. But six cities defy housing gloom.

    Home sales plunged in July and housing prices may dip again. But in six metropolitan areas, the housing picture is far brighter: Home values are rising and median prices are already well ahead of their peak during the housing bubble. What allowed these metro areas to beat the downturn in home sales prices? Two are state capitols. Five have lower-than-average unemployment. All of them had undervalued real estate, even at the height of the housing boom, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors (NAR). When mortgage rates fell, "they had room to grow" and home sales rose. Is your city on the list? Click on the right arrow to see each metro area:

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  • US loses track of terrorists in witness protection: Poor data sharing blamed

    The Justice Department inspector general found 'significant deficiencies' in the handling of known or suspected terrorists under the federal government's witness protection program.

  • Fertilizer plant blast: how lax security hints at regulatory gaps in Texas

    The Texas fertilizer plant, targeted for years by thieves who wanted anhydrous ammonia to produce drugs, reportedly had no fence, alarms, or guards. Yet state regulators raised few security concerns before the deadly blast.

  • Why did West, Texas, build homes and a school next to a 'time bomb'?

    The town of West, Texas, and the West Fertilizer Company grew and prospered together. But profit motives, a sense of civic trust and Catch-22 zoning laws failed to recognize the danger brought to light when the plant exploded this week with the force of a small nuclear bomb.

  • Texas fertilizer plant blast: Was it 'freak accident' that tore town apart?

    Authorities suspect the massive explosion in West, Texas, was an industrial accident – far from the first time that the building blocks of modern fertilizer caused heavy damage and casualties.

  • Designing for disaster

    Designing for disaster

    How the need for security leads to enhanced public spaces.

  • New goals in a new economy and world

    A Christian Science perspective: Rethinking goals can bring a deeper sense of purpose, basing life on a more solid foundation.

  • Andrew Traver: Is Obama's choice for ATF chief an 'antigun zealot'?

    Andrew Traver: Is Obama's choice for ATF chief an 'antigun zealot'?

    Obama's nomination of Andrew Traver to head the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) reignites concern that the White House wants to whittle away at gun rights. The last time that happened, Americans armed up.

  • Brand new thinking about government?

    Editor's Blog Brand new thinking about government?

    Every election -- and most of the days in between -- government takes a beating. But even if you believe that the public sector should butt out of the economy, you have to admit that roads, police, armies, and even the Internet can't happen without its involvement.

  • Home sales down. But six cities defy housing gloom.

    Home sales down. But six cities defy housing gloom.

    Home sales plunged in July and housing prices may dip again. But in six metropolitan areas, the housing picture is far brighter: Home values are rising and median prices are already well ahead of their peak during the housing bubble. What allowed these metro areas to beat the downturn in home sales prices? Two are state capitols. Five have lower-than-average unemployment. All of them had undervalued real estate, even at the height of the housing boom, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors (NAR). When mortgage rates fell, "they had room to grow" and home sales rose. Is your city on the list? Click on the right arrow to see each metro area:

  • Oklahoma City bombing: Is 1995 repeating itself today?

    Oklahoma City bombing: Is 1995 repeating itself today?

    Americans observed the 15th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing Monday. Some believe that the extremist political climate in which the bomber, Timothy McVeigh, operated is resurging.