Topic: Alexandra Marks

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • Spring's crayola colors

    Spring's crayola colors

    Photos of nature's changing palette at Sheep Dog Hollow.

  • A home made green and lean

    A home made green and lean

    Eco-aware rehabber finds that doing right by the earth is cost-effective, too.

  • Eco-renovation Solar power vs. geothermal: Which works better?

    In a 'green' home renovation, choosing a heating system comes down to deciding which is better, geothermal or leased solar panels.

  • What I didn't know about solar power – but should have

    Eco-renovation What I didn't know about solar power – but should have

    In renovating an old farrmhouse, the owner discovers that solar panels can be leased instead of purchased.

  • Eco-renovation Reconsidering solar power

    Is solar power practical for New England? Reconsidering the issue during a home renovation.

  • Composting toilets: plenty of advances but some problems remain

    Eco-renovation Composting toilets: plenty of advances but some problems remain

    Many advanced options are now available in composting toilets, but they may not be for everyone because of odor and other problems.

  • Eco-renovation Low-flow toilets have improved

    Low-flow toilets save water, but they haven't always worked as well as homeowners would like.

  • Low-flow toilets have improved

    Eco-renovation Low-flow toilets have improved

    Low-flow toilets save water, but they haven't always worked as well as homeowners would like.

  • Eco-renovation The delicate toilet question

    For a home renovation, what are the best water-saving options among new toilets?