Topic: Abu Ayyub al-Masri

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

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  • 5 terrorism suspects extradited from UK to US

    An ailing extremist Egyptian-born preacher and four other terrorism suspects arrived in the United States early Saturday under tight security to face trial after losing their lengthy extradition fight in England.

  • How Abu Hamza's extradition could create a mess for Obama

    The extradition of Abu Hamza al-Masri and four other Islamic militants from Britain to the United States comes with a number of conditions, which could create political problems for President Barack Obama as the presidential election nears.

  • Abu Hamza al-Masri extradition to US 'may proceed immediately,' British court rules (+video)

    Abu Hamza al-Masri, a radical Islamic preacher, can be extradited immediately to the US to face terrorism-related charges, Britain's High Court ruled Friday 

  • Queen Elizabeth leak: Why the BBC apologized for airing her views

    Queen Elizabeth leak: Her Majesty told a BBC journalist that the British government should have arrested radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri. This rare leak by the BBC of Queen Elizabeth's views was considered violation of journalistic ethics.

  • European court ends era of safe harbor for Abu Hamza

    The European Court of Human Rights today ruled that extraditing radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza to the US would not violate his rights and is therefore permissible.

  • Abu Hamza and 4 other terror suspects can be sent to US

    Britain can extradite five terror suspects to the US, a European court ruled. Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri is accused of trying to set up an Al Qaeda training camp in Oregon.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • Odierno: Militants trained in Iran prepare to attack US bases in Iraq

    Odierno: Militants trained in Iran prepare to attack US bases in Iraq

    Gen. Ray Odierno, the top US commander in Iraq, said today that Al Qaeda is a diminished threat and that Iran has moved away from instigating violence. But he also said that Iraqi Shiite militants who trained in Iran are planning a major attack.

  • General Odierno: Al Qaeda in Iraq faces serious financial crunch

    General Odierno: Al Qaeda in Iraq faces serious financial crunch

    General Odierno, the top US commander in Iraq, said in a Monitor interview that US and Iraqi forces have broken large Al Qaeda in Iraq rings that extorted millions of dollars a year from companies.

  • Witness: Secret Iraq prison for women and children

    Iraq's Muthanna Army base has women and children in a secret prison, says an Iraqi eyewitness. He says some are family members of Al Qaeda suspect and are used to extract confessions.