Topic: Abdel-Aziz Bouteflika

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  • How Syria and other countries use emergency rule to quash dissent

    How Syria and other countries use emergency rule to quash dissent

    The concept of emergency rule has been at the forefront of much of the Mideast unrest. Some countries have been in a “state of emergency” for decades, long after their citizens felt any threat still existed. Others have only recently implemented the emergency laws, in an effort to quell uprisings turned too large and violent for the governments to rein in. Although meant to help a country in times of danger, emergency law has sometimes been turned into a political tool.

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  • Energy Voices Algeria after terrorist attack: Don't count on security promises

    Algerian moves to increase security after a terrorist attack on a natural gas facility in January don't address the underlying security threat of doing business there. Energy and other companies must beware of the destabilizing rivalries among Algerian leaders, who use extremist groups for their own ends.

  • In Algeria, an abyss between truth and reconciliation

    Citizens whose relatives mysteriously disappeared during the 1990s civil war want facts. The government has offered compensation, but focused on forgetting the past.

  • Fifty years after Algerian freedom, youths take fresh look at France (+video)

    Younger Algerians have a more pragmatic approach to France, Algeria's former colonial master. They view engagement with the West as a necessity, especially for creating jobs through investment. 

  • In Algeria, no taste for an uprising of their own

    The violence and chaos of Algeria's civil war in the 1990s has left Algerians nervous about echoing the upheavals in other Arab countries – though many would like to strengthen democracy at home.

  • Algeria's ruling party wins polls, but turnout sends mixed message

    Algerians voted in parliamentary elections, returning the ruling party to power. But many Algerians are frustrated over high unemployment and what they see as rigid rule by an aging elite.

  • How Syria and other countries use emergency rule to quash dissent

    How Syria and other countries use emergency rule to quash dissent

    The concept of emergency rule has been at the forefront of much of the Mideast unrest. Some countries have been in a “state of emergency” for decades, long after their citizens felt any threat still existed. Others have only recently implemented the emergency laws, in an effort to quell uprisings turned too large and violent for the governments to rein in. Although meant to help a country in times of danger, emergency law has sometimes been turned into a political tool.

  • Countries in the Middle East where the 'winds of change' are blowing

    Countries in the Middle East where the 'winds of change' are blowing

    Those who said that "winds of change" were blowing through the Middle East were right. The past two months have seen a series of stunning political shifts that began with Tunisians' ousting of their former president in mid-January. Tunis and Cairo's cries, first of first anger and then of jubilation, have been beamed into living rooms across the region and are now reverberating along the North African coast, through the Gulf, and up into the Levant. Here is a look at where those "winds of change" are taking us. (Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story that originally ran on Feb. 2 and will be continually updated.)

  • In Algeria, police flood streets to prevent Egypt-style revolution

    Terrorism & Security In Algeria, police flood streets to prevent Egypt-style revolution

    Egypt's revolutionary fervor has spread to Algeria, but protesters calling for the government's ouster were outnumbered three to one by police on Saturday.

  • Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Those who said that "winds of change" were blowing through the Middle East were right. The past few weeks have seen a series of political shifts in response to widespread discontent and popular opposition that once went unacknowledged. On Friday, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak ceded to protesters in Cairo and stepped down. As Egyptians' cries, first of anger and now of jubilation, beam into living rooms throughout the Middle East, here is a look at where those "winds of change" are taking us. (Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story that originally ran on Feb. 2)

  • Young Algerians, struggling to find opportunities, look to Europe for a better future

    President Bouteflika is pledging $150 billion to create jobs. Algerian young people – an estimated 70 percent of whom can't find work – are getting impatient.