Topic: Fukushima Daiichi

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  • Photos of the Day Photos of the day 03/22

    Three oiled rock hopper penguins on the island chain of Tristan da Cunha. Thousands of endangered penguins have been coated with oil after a cargo ship ran aground and broke up on a remote British South Atlantic territory. The shipwreck also threatens the lobster fishery that provides a livelihood to one of the world's most isolated communities.

  • Japan earthquake leaves ghost towns in its wake

    Japan earthquake leaves ghost towns in its wake

    For large swathes of the coast hit hardest by the March 11 Japan earthquake and tsunami, a daunting rebuilding effort is exacerbated by years of falling birth rates and a youth exodus to big cities.

  • Nikkei surges, other stock markets quiet

    Nikkei surges, other stock markets quiet

    Japan's stock market index surges 4.4 percent as outlook for Japanese nuclear plant improves. Other stock markets in Asia, Europe little changed

  • Natural gas, other fuel for Japan: Who'll supply them?

    Natural gas, other fuel for Japan: Who'll supply them?

    Natural gas and other conventional fuel imports will rise after Japan's nuclear disaster. Asian exporters of natural gas, coal, and oil should see the biggest boost.

  • Japan says high seawater radiation levels are no cause for alarm

    Japan says high seawater radiation levels are no cause for alarm

    Japanese authorities began testing for radiation in seawater near the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on Tuesday, but officials stressed that the elevated levels are no cause for worry.

  • Four ways Japan disaster affects investors

    Four ways Japan disaster affects investors

    When the world’s third-largest economy is hit with its worst earthquake ever, a tsunami, and a subsequent nuclear crisis, the human and physical toll has been enormous. The disaster is also sending ripples through the world economy. Here is a look at four ways the Japanese crisis changes the investment landscape:

  • US agrees to help Chile go nuclear, despite Japan disaster

    US agrees to help Chile go nuclear, despite Japan disaster

    Even as radiation leaked from Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, the US and Chile signed a nuclear power cooperation agreement, days ahead of President Obama's visit Monday.

  • Nuclear power in America: Five reasons why it's safe and reliable

    Opinion Nuclear power in America: Five reasons why it's safe and reliable

    Though the crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant appears to be stabilizing, the United States is stepping up inspections of the country’s 104 nuclear reactors. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission today announced that inspectors will soon visit all US reactors to ensure they can withstand the kind of “severe accident” that led to Japan’s emergency. That emergency has caused many Americans to wonder about the future of nuclear power. Is it safe and dependable? Yes, says Tony Pietrangelo, chief nuclear officer and senior vice president of the Nuclear Energy Institute (the organization of the nuclear energy and technologies industry). Here’s why:

  • How much will Fukushima impact the nuclear power industry?

    The Adam Smith Institute Blog How much will Fukushima impact the nuclear power industry?

    The disaster at the Japanese nuclear plant is already affecting how countries around the world think of nuclear power. Will it affect the price of electricity, too?

  • Workers evacuated from Japan nuclear plant, again

    Workers evacuated from Japan nuclear plant, again

    But workers made progress over the weekend on restoring electricity to the cooling system at Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant, which will help stabilize overheated reactors.

 
 
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