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  • Top 5 on Forbes rich list? Bill, Warren ... and Carlos!

    Top 5 on Forbes rich list? Bill, Warren ... and Carlos!

    Forbes came out with its annual ranking of the world's richest people Thursday. This year's Top 5 billionaires made their money in software, luxury goods, investments, and telecommunications. But the No. 1 has pulled far ahead of his rivals. Here's how the Top 5 stack up:

  • Carlos Slim: Poor nation billionaires high on Forbes rich list

    Carlos Slim: Poor nation billionaires high on Forbes rich list

    Carlos Slim retained the top spot on the Forbes rich list for the second year in a row. The Mexican telecoms tycoon represents a growing trend of billionaires bubbling up from emerging markets worldwide. Over the past year, China doubled its number of billionaires, according to Forbes, and Moscow now has more billionaires than any other city. Of the 11 richest men in the world, the following five come from emerging economies in Latin America and Asia:

  • WikiLeaks: Is there a future for the website without Julian Assange?

    WikiLeaks: Is there a future for the website without Julian Assange?

    With founder Julian Assange grappling with his personal legal problems, some analysts say WikiLeaks has to chart an independent course, much as Apple needs to look beyond Steve Jobs.

  • Be a giver

    A Christian Science perspective.

  • The politics of being really, really rich

    Africa Monitor The politics of being really, really rich

    A recent article in The Atlantic about the world's super rich makes it clear that it's an interest in humanity binds the poor to the rich.

  • Without Steve Jobs, can Apple's 'very strong bench' step up?

    Without Steve Jobs, can Apple's 'very strong bench' step up?

    Apple can survive financially without Steve Jobs. But does anyone else at Apple have his ability 'to know what people want before they even know they want it'? Some observers say 'visionaries spawn other visionaries.' Others have doubts.

  • Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    On the first anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, global disaster relief is under the microscope. A $15-billion-a-year industry with 250,000 workers, the stakes are high – but from each tsunami, quake, hurricane, and drought, we learn what works and what doesn't.

  • Ideas for a better world in 2011

    Ideas for a better world in 2011

    In many ways, 2010 is a year you may want to relegate to the filing cabinet quickly. It began with a massive earthquake in Haiti and wound down with North Korea once again being an enfant terrible – bizarrely trying to conduct diplomacy through brinkmanship. In between came Toyota recalls and egg scares, pat downs at airports and unyielding unemployment numbers, too little money in the Irish treasury and too many bedbugs in American sheets. Oil gushed from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico for three months, mocking the best intentions of man and technology to stop it, while ash from a volcano in Iceland darkened Europe temporarily as much as its balance sheets. Yet not all was gloomy. The winter Olympics in Canada and the World Cup in South Africa dazzled with their displays of athletic prowess and national pride, becoming hearths around which the world gathered. In Switzerland, the world's largest atom smasher hurled two protons into each other at unfathomable speeds. Then came the year's most poignant moment – the heroic and improbable rescue of 33 miners from the clutches of the Chilean earth. There were many transitions, too – the return of the Republicans in Washington and the Tories in Britain, the scaling back of one war (Iraq) and the escalation of another (Afghanistan), the fall of some powers (Greece) and rise of others (China, Germany, Lady Gaga). To get the new year off to the right start, we decided to ask various thinkers for one idea each to make the world a better place in 2011. We plumbed poets and political figures, physicists and financiers, theologians and novelists. Some of the ideas are provocative, others quixotic. Some you will agree with, others you won't. But in the modest quest to stir a discussion – from academic salons to living rooms to government corridors – we offer these 25 ideas.

  • Richard Branson bemoans 'overeducated,' risk-averse entrepreneurs: WikiLeaks

    Richard Branson bemoans 'overeducated,' risk-averse entrepreneurs: WikiLeaks

    In a January 2008 meeting with Chinese businessmen, billionaire Sir Richard Branson agreed 'that British entrepreneurs are overeducated and that schooling does not prepare one for entering the business world.'

  • You bought it. Are you happy?

    You bought it. Are you happy?

    Money can make you happier – to a point – but not in the way you think.