All list articles

  • Bobby Cox: One of baseball's best managers ever? Our Top 5 picks

    Bobby Cox: One of baseball's best managers ever? Our Top 5 picks

    Following Atlanta's 3-2 loss to the Giants Monday night in the National League Division Series, Braves manager Bobby Cox retired after 29 seasons as a major league skipper. That got us to thinking about the best managers of all time. How would you make that choice? Best win-loss ratio? Most World Series wins? We decided to use post-season playoff appearances. Drawing on Baseball-Reference.com and BaseballHall.org, here's our top five list.

  • Top 10 countries for women: Global Gender Gap Index 2010

    The World Economic Forum released its 2010 Global Gender Gap Report on Tuesday. The report, which indexed 134 countries this year, evaluates how much of the gender gap each country has eliminated through economic opportunity, health access, education, and political empowerment. Below are the 10 countries that have been most successful. You can also read more about this year's report at our Global News blog.

  • Chile mine rescue: 5 final steps to freedom

    Chile mine rescue: 5 final steps to freedom

    It took 33 days to drill a 622-meter shaft down to the 33 trapped miners, completed Monday. Several steps remain before freedom comes to the men who have lived a half-mile under the Atacama Desert since a mine collapse on Aug. 5.

  • Which nation has the most in vitro babies? Here are the Top 5.

    Which nation has the most in vitro babies? Here are the Top 5.

    In the United States, in vitro fertilization (IVF) is responsible for 1 in 75 new births, creating a whole new industry over the past three decades. Worldwide, IVF contributes more than 1 in 50 new births in 17 countries. Who has the most? It depends on how you count. Of the more than 4 million IVF babies that have been born since 1978, the largest number are in the US, followed by other wealthy populous nations, such as Japan and France. But which countries have the greatest share of 'test tube' babies? Here are the Top 5:

  • Unemployment up? Not in these four maverick cities.

    Unemployment up? Not in these four maverick cities.

    The US lost jobs in September and the unemployment rate remains at a high 9.6 percent, the US Department of Labor reported Friday. But some metropolitan areas are bucking the trend and adding jobs. By making everything from food to music and band instruments, these four metros have seen the biggest year-over-year decline in their unemployment rates. Is your city on this list?

  • Who were the previous 10 Nobel Peace Prize winners?

    Who were the previous 10 Nobel Peace Prize winners?

    Imprisoned Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Friday for his long and nonviolent struggle for human rights in his country. Here is a list of the past 10 Nobel Peace Prize winners and why the committee chose them.

  • Test your Nobel Peace Prize knowledge. Take our quiz.

    Test your Nobel Peace Prize knowledge. Take our quiz.

    Liu Xiaobo, a pro-democracy activist, won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Friday for his decades of non-violent struggle for human rights in China. Beijing was not impressed. Mr. Liu is currently in a Chinese prison serving out an 11-year sentence as the lead author of Chapter 08, a manifesto calling for free speech and multi-party elections. The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the richest and most prestigious awards in the world. The prize includes a $1.5 million award. But how much do you really know about the Nobel Peace Prize? Take our 15-question quiz.

  • How Victor Perez saved abducted girl: four tales of everyday heroes

    How Victor Perez saved abducted girl: four tales of everyday heroes

    California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday honored Victor Perez, the man behind the improbable car chase that resulted in the recovery of an 8-year-old girl abducted in Fresno, Calif. 'This guy is a true action hero,' said the governor. Here is his story and the stories of three other everyday heroes who responded to trying circumstances with extraordinary grace or courage.

  • Nobel Prize in Literature: Which Latin American writers have won?

    Nobel Prize in Literature: Which Latin American writers have won?

    Mario Vargas Llosa is the first Latin American to win the honored literary prize in 12 years. Of the 102 awards presented since 1901, only eight have gone to Latin American writers.

  • Hungary toxic sludge reaches Danube River: Top 10 environmental disasters worldwide

    Hungary toxic sludge reaches Danube River: Top 10 environmental disasters worldwide

    The toxic sludge now covering 15 square miles of Hungary and seeping into the Danube River is a serious environmental disaster whose severity and long-term consequences are still unclear. Will the release of the 35 million cubic feet of alumina refining waste become one of the Top 10 manmade environmental disasters of the past century?

  • Mario Vargas Llosa wins 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. Who else won in the past decade?

    Mario Vargas Llosa wins 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. Who else won in the past decade?

    Mario Vargas Llosa has won the 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. The Peruvian author and former presidential candidate received the prestigious Cervantes Prize in 1995 and is the first South American author to win the Nobel since Gabriel García Márquez won the award in 1982. Here are the past decade's winners.

  • Naked Cowboy for president: Top celebrities (past and present) who aimed for the White House

    Naked Cowboy for president: Top celebrities (past and present) who aimed for the White House

    Forget the midterm elections, President Obama's competition in the 2012 election is growing. On Oct. 6 Robert Burck announced his candidacy for president for the 2012 elections. You know him better as the "Naked Cowboy," a famous New York City attraction in Times Square. Burck's announcement comes on the heels of another celeb gone potential presidential candidate: Donald Trump. Donald Trump, in a round of TV interviews Tuesday, said he was "seriously" considering running for president in 2012. "For the first time in my life, I'm actually thinking about it," Trump, who declared himself a Republican, told Fox News Channel. Though they are the most recent, Burck and Trump are by no means the first celebrities to aim for the White House.

  • The Social Network: Four things the movie got wrong

    The Social Network: Four things the movie got wrong

    'The Social Network,' a new film directed by David Fincher, and based on a book by Ben Mezrich, topped the box office charts in the US over the weekend. But critics of the film say Fincher and Mezrich got plenty of things wrong, from the history of Facebook to the portrayal of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

  • Iraq shakes up rankings of oil nations. Who's on top?

    Iraq shakes up rankings of oil nations. Who's on top?

    With new estimates released Monday, Iraq jumped a spot in the rankings of nations with the biggest oil reserves. If oil prices surge, these energy behemoths will benefit the most. Here's the new order of the Top 5 nations.

  • Europe travel alert: Eight steps Americans can take

    Europe travel alert: Eight steps Americans can take

    You have booked tickets for the Paris International Photo Fair or perhaps your son is already in Berlin studying German. Now that the US State Department has issued a “travel advisory” for Europe, what should you do? Cancel the trip? Bring junior home? Professional travel advisers say it is too soon to hit the panic button. Here are eight things you can consider doing:

  • Top 10 Ways Obama Can Boost His Popularity with Younger Voters

    Top 10 Ways Obama Can Boost His Popularity with Younger Voters

    On Wednesday night, David Letterman gave viewers the "Top 10 Ways Obama Can Boost His Popularity with Younger Voters," on "The Late Show." President Barack Obama's been courting youth all week. He's visited the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisc., shared his iPod playlist with "Rolling Stone," and called for education reforms such as a longer school year. Really? Shortening the Summer vacation is going to win over the youth vote? Obama apparently not only needs to energize the Democratic party as a whole, he's got to reconnect and ignite the young Democrats that helped get him elected in 2008. A recent ABC/Washington Post Poll found that only 55 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds say they are “absolutely certain” to go to the polls this year, as opposed to 78 percent of 50- to 64-year-olds and 77 percent of those over age 65. Enter Letterman. His satirical adjustments, include changing Obama's name to Bajustin Obieber, might be more of a crowd pleaser than a "Yes we can" chant. We think the Justin Bieber crowd may be a bit too young to vote. But you decide. Check out our photo illustrations of Letterman's recommendations for connecting with young voters.

  • The Flintstones turns 50: The five dumbest moments

    The Flintstones turns 50: The five dumbest moments

    The Flintstones is a classic. Fifty years after the show first aired, Fred, Wilma, and the gang are still popular enough to gain a seat atop Google's homepage. But their place in the cartoon pantheon doesn't mean that they're infallible. The Flintstones did some pretty stupid things in their day. Here are five of the dumbest. Click through to read them all.

  • 3 promising books for October

    3 promising books for October

    It's fall – when our thoughts turn to books. If you're looking for some good literary companionship for these shorter days and longer nights, here are three attractive titles coming this October.

  • Bestselling books the week of Sept. 30, 2010, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of Sept. 30, 2010, according to IndieBound*

  • Fisher-Price recall: Here's a list of what's included

    Fisher-Price recall: Here's a list of what's included

    Fisher-Price recalled almost 11 million toys and children's products on Sept. 30. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission warns parents and caregivers to keep children away from the affected toys. Fisher-Price has detailed information at this website on how to get free replacement parts or repair kits for the toys. Here's a list of the recalled items:

  • 6 great books about the loss of Lincoln

    6 great books about the loss of Lincoln

    The laughter rippled across Ford's Theatre as a character on stage let loose with a zinger: "You sockdologizing old man-trap!" John Wilkes Booth knew the audience would guffaw in delight, so that's when he fired his gun at the president of the United States. But people heard the noise anyway: "Pop!" Then there was chaos. An assassination, one of several planned that night in the nation's capital, had succeeded. What happened and why? Six captivating books from the last decade – including the newly released "Bloody Crimes" by the bestselling author of "Manhunt" – fill in the gaps and track Abraham Lincoln's legacy.

  • Meg Whitman and the perils of employing illegal help: six memorable cases

    Meg Whitman and the perils of employing illegal help: six memorable cases

    Meg Whitman, California GOP gubernatorial candidate, is alleged to have employed a housekeeper from 2000 to 2009 even though she knew the woman was in the US illegally. It's a political bombshell for Ms. Whitman. The politics of household employment and immigration have proved tricky before. Here are six prominent cases, plus the allegations against Whitman.

  • Tea Party 101: Who are its followers and what do they want?

    Tea Party 101: Who are its followers and what do they want?

    Of all the protest signs at all the rallies where people gathered last year to object to Washington's plans to save the US economy and reform healthcare, this hand-lettered one is memorable: "You can't fix stupid, but you can vote it out." That's the "tea party" movement in a nutshell. Here's a look at the tea party movement – its birth, its leadership, and its aspirations.

  • Banned Books Week: Why these 10 classics got kicked out of class

    Banned Books Week: Why these 10 classics got kicked out of class

    Is this is a roundup of objectionable literature – or a Great Books roster? The same titles that some call great literature others find to be filthy, bad, or dangerous. Here are a handful of the often surprising – and sometimes downright baffling – reasons that objectors around the world wanted to ban these books.

  • Stephen Colbert and laughable politics: Five comedians who ran for office

    Stephen Colbert and laughable politics: Five comedians who ran for office

    American politics have been the subject of satire since before the country's founding – a political cartoon depicting a snake cut into eight parts, representing eight American colonial governments, ran in Benjamin Franklin's newspaper in 1754. These days the US benefits from a healthy dose of humorous political commentary, but when the jokers run for political office (jokingly of course, right?) some funny things can happen. Here are five memorable ones.