All list articles

  • Osama bin Laden's compound: 4 oddities

    Osama bin Laden's compound: 4 oddities

    The press has descended en masse to the sleepy town of Abbottabad, Pakistan, considered an idyllic vacation spot until Sunday when it became more famously known as the final hideout of Osama bin Laden. Any hopes of catching a glimpse inside Mr. bin Laden's secret compound were dashed, however, as Pakistani forces are tightly guarding the area and the Army literally chased down Western journalists who attempted to get close. After the Army departed today and left security in the hands of local police, reporters were able to climb atop nearby buildings to see what they could of the mysterious hideout of America's most-wanted terrorist. Here is what one reporter observed:

  • The top 5 militant leaders still hiding in Pakistan

    The top 5 militant leaders still hiding in Pakistan

    Osama bin Laden was not the only Al Qaeda leader hiding in Pakistan. The US believes there are others, including people on its list of Most Wanted Terrorists.

  • Top 5 Al Qaeda-linked militants Pakistan has captured

    Top 5 Al Qaeda-linked militants Pakistan has captured

    Amid an official US probe into whether the Pakistani military knew of Osama bin Laden's hiding spot and if they shielded him, it could be easy to overlook Pakistan's notable successes against alleged Al Qaeda militants, thousands of whom have been killed or captured by Pakistani forces over the past decade. Here's a look at five of the highest-profile Al Qaeda captures in Pakistan with the help of the local security services.

  • 6 best children's books, as voted on by kids

    6 best children's books, as voted on by kids

    It's Children’s Book Week 2011 and to celebrate 500,000 young readers across the US had a chance to vote for their favorite books. Here are the titles, authors, and illustrators that this year's record-breaking number of kid voters chose to honor as 2011 Children's Choice Awards winners.

  • Osama bin Laden dead: What jihadi websites are saying

    Osama bin Laden dead: What jihadi websites are saying

    Online supporters of Osama bin Laden and his campaign of global jihad reacted with confusion, sadness, and often anger following the news that Osama bin Laden is dead, killed by US special forces in Pakistan Sunday. Here is a sampling of four ways commenters on pro-jihadi websites responded – translated by Aaron Zelin, a researcher at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., and operator of his own website that studies Islamic radicalism online, Jihadology.

  • SEAL Team Six: 10 questions on the operation that killed Osama bin Laden

    SEAL Team Six: 10 questions on the operation that killed Osama bin Laden

    For a decade, it was an ongoing effort – one that a senior Obama administration official called on Monday morning “America’s most vexing intelligence problem: where to find bin Laden.” Here are 10 questions and answers about how the operatives commonly known as ‘SEAL Team Six’ killed Osama bin Laden.

  • Osama bin Laden: 7 books that offer insight into the man and his actions

    Osama bin Laden: 7 books that offer insight into the man and his actions

    Who was Osama bin Laden? The mastermind behind the 9/11 terrorist plot was one of the best-known men in the world and yet in many ways he remained an enigma. The son of a wealthy businessman, the man whom most Westerners knew as an archterrorist was also a soft-spoken family man with a fondness for poetry. The following books offer insight into Osama bin Laden – the man, his convictions, and how he came to cast so large a shadow over the Western world.

  • Abbottabad, Pakistan: 5 things to know about where bin Laden died

    Abbottabad, Pakistan: 5 things to know about where bin Laden died

    Abbottabad, Pakistan, was a midsized city unknown to most outside the country until late Sunday night, when President Obama announced that the US had found and killed 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden there. Here are five facts to put Abbottabad, Pakistan, in context.

  • Syria 101: 4 attributes of Assad's authoritarian regime

    Syria 101: 4 attributes of Assad's authoritarian regime

    How have authoritarian regimes remained in control so long in the Middle East? In Syria's case, a critical factor is the concentration of power in a single family, political party, and religious sect.

  • 6 great books about British queens

    6 great books about British queens

    And here you thought your wedding was a bit on the stressful side. At least you're not Kate Middleton, whose every step – especially any misstep – will be broadcast live to the world. It won't get any easier if she ever becomes the consort of the king. On the bright side, she's marrying a handsome and energetic young man. Then again, Henry VIII's first queen did the exact same thing. As for the five that followed her, well, as the old rhyme puts it: "Divorced, beheaded, died. Divorced, beheaded, survived." As she figures out her strategy to keep her position (and her man), "Waity Katie" might be wise to sit back and read these instructive books about Henry VIII's queens. This time around, let's hope only the lessons roll, with everyone's heads staying right where they belong.

  • Bestselling books the week of 4/28/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 4/28/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Five key questions: How the London police plan to protect the royal wedding

    Five key questions: How the London police plan to protect the royal wedding

    More than 1 million people are expected to crowd London's streets Friday for the wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton. While royal fans speculate about the wedding dress, British police are fretting over security. Check out five questions (and answers) about the plan for keeping the royal family safe.

  • The Fed speaks: Five times Federal Reserve chairmen made waves with words

    The Fed speaks: Five times Federal Reserve chairmen made waves with words

    The Federal Reserve, the institution tasked with guarding the economy against inflation and financial instability, has long made headlines for its words as well as its actions. An utterance from the chairman can help reassure financial markets or raise concerns about the economy. Now the central bank is moving to explain itself more openly in its first-ever formalized press conferences, so the opportunity for Fed officials to make market-moving pronouncements may increase. Here's a look at some moments when a Fed chairman has made waves with his words.

  • 10 top royal love stories

    10 top royal love stories

    Our fascination with the romance between Prince William and Kate Middleton is nothing new. The world has always loved a royal love story and a stack of books from over the ages proves that to be true. Here are 10 of the most interesting.

  • The roar of Ron Paul: Five of his unorthodox views on the economy

    The roar of Ron Paul: Five of his unorthodox views on the economy

    Ron Paul, the Texas congressman who is expected to announce an official "exploratory committee" for a presidential run Tuesday, is known for his passionate espousal of free markets and sound money. To supporters, Congressman Paul has stood as a lone voice of reason in Congress, wiser than Wall Street. Critics see his views on issues like reviving a gold standard or ending the Federal Reserve as simplistic and more dangerous than the ills he hopes to cure. Here are his own words on key economic issues:

  • Chernobyl disaster: four ways it continues to have an impact

    Chernobyl disaster: four ways it continues to have an impact

    Twenty-five years ago April 26, nuclear reactor No. 4 at the Chernobyl power plant exploded, sending waves of radiation across Ukraine and into neighboring countries. The disaster, which remains the world’s worst nuclear accident, continues to have an effect today. Here are four ways:

  • NBA title contenders: Which teams have the most championships?

    NBA title contenders: Which teams have the most championships?

    The NBA playoffs are well underway. It started with 16 teams, trying to stay in the game over a two-month stretch to earn the title 'NBA Champions.' However, there are a handful of teams that have established themselves as the cream of the pro-basketball crop, having won multiple NBA titles since 1947.

  • Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Thousands of teachers are being notified this spring that their jobs are in jeopardy – and many of those layoffs may actually occur, given the severe budget crises affecting state and local governments. The result is renewed scrutiny of the seniority rules that govern layoffs in many states. Just in the past month, Florida has done away with such rules, and Georgia is on its way.

  • Royal wedding: Who Prince William and Kate Middleton invited

    Royal wedding: Who Prince William and Kate Middleton invited

    Prince William and Kate Middleton have invited 1,900 people to join them when they tie the knot Friday at Westminster Abbey. Much of the invite list is dictated by tradition and diplomacy, but 1,000 attendees were also invited as "friends and family." Here's a look at some notables on the list, from Grammy-winners to representatives criticized by the international community for violating human rights.

  • Taliban tunnel: Five militant escapes under US watch

    Taliban tunnel: Five militant escapes under US watch

    If Western audiences are inspired by the film "Shawshank Redemption" about a solo prison escape, then Taliban sympathizers must surely be heartened by today's spectacular escape of some 500 inmates from a Kandahar prison through a 1,180-foot-long tunnel. But while character Andy Dufresne had to dig out of Shawshank prison without any assistance, the Taliban prisoners are suspected of having help from guards. This is not the first jail break that has set back the US wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, nor is it even the first escape from this specific prison. Here's a short list of recent prison breaks (and one near-escape) in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  • Egypt erases history: 5 places where the Mubarak name will be removed

    Egypt erases history: 5 places where the Mubarak name will be removed

    An Egyptian court on April 21 ordered the physical removal of the Mubarak family name from all public places, formalizing a process that protesters began months ago. With Hosni Mubarak's name and face plastered on everything from street signs to stadiums to train stations, it will take a long time for the state to fully remove his mark. Here are a few of places to be scrubbed of the Mubarak moniker:

  • Election 101: Who is Gary Johnson?

    Election 101: Who is Gary Johnson?

    Gary Johnson, who has already scaled Mt. Everest, has chosen the presidency as his next summit. The former New Mexico governor declared his candidacy on April 21 in New Hampshire. "America needs a ‘President Veto’ right now – someone who will say no to insane spending and stop the madness that has become Washington," he said in a statement. A libertarian-leaning, tee-totaling triathlete often dubbed “the next Ron Paul,” Mr. Johnson is a maverick whose liberal views on marijuana might smoke his White House bid.

  • Maundy Thursday: Queen Elizabeth gives out money, Czech children go skinny dipping

    Maundy Thursday: Queen Elizabeth gives out money, Czech children go skinny dipping

    Maundy Thursday commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles, falling every year on the day before Good Friday. While the Roman Catholic Church calls it "Holy Thursday," the Anglican Church uses the name "Maundy Thursday" in accordance with the Old English phrasing of Jesus' commandment that humans should love one another. Here are ways that five European nations celebrate the Christian holiday, starting in Britain with Queen Elizabeth.

  • 4/21/11 bestselling book list, according to IndieBound*

    4/21/11 bestselling book list, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Opinion Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Michel “Sweet Mickey” Martelly has officially – and finally – been proclaimed president-elect of Haiti, and he is savoring his success – in the United States. His victory tour began Tuesday in Washington, where he is meeting with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, along with officials from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Mr. Martelly was finally declared the official winner of the election late last night, more than two weeks after officials from Haiti's Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) announced he had edged out former first lady Mirlande Manigat in a runoff with over 67 percent of the vote. The wait has been long for Haitians, who first went to the polls last November to elect a president, along with a parliament, carrying high expectations that a new leader could end the long nightmare they have endured since the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake that ravaged their country – and even before. The battered country’s future is now in the hands of the 50-year-old Martelly, a popular singer with little political experience, but who led an impressive campaign. Martlelly will now have the following five immediate tasks to address: