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  • Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound

    Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America

  • Fall books: 12 fiction titles you don't want to miss

    Fall books: 12 fiction titles you don't want to miss

    From Ireland to India, and from the year AD 73 to the possible end of the world, here are 12 of the most enticing of the fall 2011 fiction titles.

  • Crunch time at Postal Service: Five questions about post office closings.

    Crunch time at Postal Service: Five questions about post office closings.

    Among the thousands of post offices under review for closure is a cramped branch in downtown Elmira, N.Y., bustling on a rainy summer afternoon. It was, until recently, a place retiree Charlotte Dumas took for granted. She visits the downtown branch about three times a week. "I would hate to see it close," she says. "It's so convenient." And it's a bargain. The United States Postal Service (USPS) delivers an average of 563 million pieces of mail a day, six days a week. For a 44-cent stamp, you can send a letter to the far reaches of the nation. Rain, sleet, and manic dogs don't stop the service, which carries mail by pack mule to the Havasupai Indian reservation at the bottom of the Grand Canyon and operates branches in towns of fewer than 100 residents. Too good to be true? It might soon be. To help close a $20 billion revenue shortfall by 2015, the USPS may be forced to shutter as many as 3,700 post offices nationwide.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • The world's top universities in 2011

    For the second year in a row, the United Kingdom’s University of Cambridge topped America’s Harvard University in the annual QS ranking of the world’s top universities. Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), a UK-based higher education consulting firm, released its much-anticipated list of the top 300 today. Academic reputation – a subjective assessment – accounts for 40 percent of the score that determines where schools end up on the rankings. You can get a closer look at the methodology here. This year’s top 10 dropped American universities Princeton and California Institute of Technology in favor of two other leading US schools. You can check out last year’s top 10 here and explore why QS’s rankings caused such a stir.

  • Stock prices tumbling? Four ways to control your risk.

    Stock prices tumbling? Four ways to control your risk.

    If the wild plunges and rebounds in stock prices have made a yo-yo of your portfolio, welcome to a very big club. The gyrations in stock markets worldwide have forced investors everywhere to confront an uncomfortable reality: Short of stuffing your money in a bank or under your mattress, you have to cope with volatility and risk. Fortunately, there are ways to tame risk – even turn it to your advantage. Here are four steps that you can take to begin to reduce the risk of falling stock prices for your long-term portfolio:

  • Fall books: 20 nonfiction titles you don't want to miss

    Fall books: 20 nonfiction titles you don't want to miss

    From the energy crisis to The Doors, from Hitler’s Germany to Rin Tin Tin, here are the nonfiction titles that have readers buzzing this fall.

  • Labor Day: 5 things you probably didn't know about the end-of-summer holiday

    Labor Day: 5 things you probably didn't know about the end-of-summer holiday

    Labor Day: From a debate surrounding the holiday's founder to an enigmatic social rule, the history of Labor Day offers plenty of material to keep you reading on your time away.

  • 'Zero job' economy: 11 ways Washington can fix it

    'Zero job' economy: 11 ways Washington can fix it

    A stagnant job market has ramped up pressure on President Obama and Congress to find solutions. A Sept. 2 report from the Labor Department hammered the problem home: The US economy produced no net jobs in August. So, what can be done? There's no shortage of policy ideas. Here are 11 that include controversial proposals plus others that might win bipartisan support.

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/1/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 9/1/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Nancy Grace, Chaz Bono cast in Dancing with the Stars Season 13

    Nancy Grace, Chaz Bono cast in Dancing with the Stars Season 13

    Nancy Grace and Chaz Bono will join the cast for Season 13 of ABC's Dancing with the Stars. The entire cast was revealed by America's Funniest Home Videos host Tom Bergeron and Dancing with the Stars Season 7 champion Brooke Burke, who co-hosted Monday night's announcement at the end of an episode of the reality TV show "Bachelor Pad." DWTS pairs celebrities with professional dancers (and choreographers) who perform in front of a panel of the three judges, Len Goodman, Bruno Tonioli, and Carrie Ann Inaba. Viewers can vote for their favorite dancing couples. Last season's winner was Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward and professional dancer Kym Johnson. Six of the past 12 DWTS winners have been athletes. The DWTS head of casting says, “There are some strong personalities [in Season 13]," USA today reports, "Any time it gets people talking, obviously that's a good thing. It gets people watching. This first show is definitely going to be water-cooler talk." The show opens on Sept. 19. Who are the DWTS Season 13 contestants?

  • Japan's latest pop stars: androids and animations

    Japan's latest pop stars: androids and animations

    Pop divas Eguchi Aimi and Hatsune Miku have throngs of fans across Japan, an impressive feat considering both singers are computer generated. They lead a growing trend in Japan of artificial stars seizing the spotlight. Here are videos of some of the most popular. Look for "Uncanny Valley: Will we ever learn to live with artificial humans?" – the Monitor's full story on what these fabricated 'humans' tell us about real ones.

  • What is Eid al-Fitr?

    What is Eid al-Fitr?

    For most Muslims, Eid al-Fitr, the joyous end to the month-long fast of Ramadan, began last night. What's it all about?

  • First credit card? Five key tips for college students.

    First credit card? Five key tips for college students.

    If getting a credit card is a rite of passage for college students, choosing the right plastic and learning how to use it responsibly is a matter of life and debt. Young people age 18 to 24, carry an average credit card debt of $2,002, according to CreditKarma.com. Before you end up as a debt statistic, learn to pick the right card and manage your credit before getting your hands on plastic. Here are five things every new credit cardholder should know:

  • Steve Jobs: One of the greatest business leaders?

    Steve Jobs: One of the greatest business leaders?

    Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs saw the company through its infancy, its early tremors of doubt, and its wild bouts of success. Among his more significant lessons was this: Being best is more important than being first. How does Jobs, who passed away Oct. 5, 2011, stack up against America's great business leaders when tested by his own rule? Here's a look at how he compares with five of the greats:

  • What happens next in Libya? America's five greatest concerns.

    What happens next in Libya? America's five greatest concerns.

    The push toward a post-Qaddafi regime in Libya is raising questions in Washington about how far a US commitment extends to ensuring a peaceful transition to democracy. The rationale for US and NATO engagement in Libya was to avoid a massacre of civilians in March. Now, as the civil war moves toward a resolution, the Obama administration and Congress appear to be taking a wait-and-see approach. But with an eye to lessons from regime change in Iraq, some lawmakers are urging steps now to help shape the transition in Libya, including some moves that put them at odds with the Obama administration. Here are five.

  • Who are Forbes' 10 most powerful women?

    Who are Forbes' 10 most powerful women?

    Every year, Forbes releases a list of the world’s most powerful woman, influential in everything from politics to technology to culture. The list includes obvious choices, such as US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, but also includes unexpected choices, such as Lady Gaga (No. 11 this year). Here are the 10 most powerful women: (See full list here)

  • Money management: Five steps to improve it in your marriage

    Money management: Five steps to improve it in your marriage

    Men may be from Mars, and women from Venus – as the 1992 best-seller put it – but we deal with money matters on planet Earth. When a spender marries a penny pincher and they don't talk about managing money, it can strain a marriage. Of all the common things couples fight about, money disputes are the best harbingers of divorce, according to a study at Utah State University. Make it a goal this year to improve the money management in your home by opening up the channels of communication. Here are five steps to get you started:

  • Hurricane preparedness: 5 things you can do to keep safe

    Hurricane preparedness: 5 things you can do to keep safe

    Hurricane Irene, the first of the 2011 season, has done damage in the British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. People on the East Coast of the US are now readying themselves for their own imminent encounter with the storm. If you live in that part of the country, what can you do to protect your home and your loved ones?

  • 3 late-summer novels too good to miss

    3 late-summer novels too good to miss

    Our final fiction roundup of the summer features an eclectic lineup: One is a fantasy epic, the second is a quirky first novel about an avant-garde family, and the third is a somber look at the kidnapping of a political dissident. All, however, are really good.

  • Hurricane insurance: Do you have it? Need it? Six things to know.

    Hurricane insurance: Do you have it? Need it? Six things to know.

    Hurricane insurance has a unique place in the world of insurance. Just as hurricanes can do all sorts of damage to a house – from wind, flood, and rain – so hurricane insurance requires a multifaceted approach beyond typical homeowners insurance. Some hurricane damage is covered by homeowners insurance. Then there's a government-run program for flooding. As hurricane Irene heads for the East Coast, here are answers to six key questions:

  • Where is Qaddafi now?

    Libyan strongman Muammar Qaddafi has made plenty of pronouncements since rebels overran Tripoli last weekend – but no one has seen him. His absence from the cameras has prompted a guessing game about his whereabouts. Below are some of the possibilities being circulated by Libya watchers:

  • Bestselling books the week of 8/25/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 8/25/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Spots to watch in the battle for Tripoli

    Spots to watch in the battle for Tripoli

    Libya’s rebels staged a swift takeover of much of Tripoli over the weekend and into today, and they now control 80 to 95 percent of the capital. Forces loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi are nonetheless fighting fiercely to hold on to pockets of the city still in their hands. Below are some of the most embattled areas.

 
 
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