All list articles

  • From 'blast boxers' to Golden-i: Five military gadgets that could change war

    From 'blast boxers' to Golden-i: Five military gadgets that could change war

    With billions of dollars at its disposal, the Pentagon is one of the incubators of technological innovation in the US. Here's a look at five new items of military technology that could add a little more James Bond to America's warfighters. 

  • Foreign students storm the US: Five facts about who they are

    Foreign students storm the US: Five facts about who they are

    International students flocked to US colleges and universities in record numbers in the 2010-11 academic year. The number surged nearly 5 percent over the previous year, reaching 723,277, according to the latest annual "Open Doors" report by the Institute of International Education and the State Department. The jump suggests a global hunger for the cachet and opportunity afforded by an American college education – despite the high cost to families and foreign governments. Foreign students contribute more than $21 billion to the US economy in tuition costs, book-buying, and living expenses – making higher education a top US service-sector export, the report finds. The makeup of international students in the US is changing in some surprising ways. Here are five.

  • 10 pieces of wisdom from Mindy Kaling

    10 pieces of wisdom from Mindy Kaling

    In her new book 'Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns),' 'The Office' star and writer Mindy Kaling shares her thoughts on why she's not a natural babysitter and which types of women in romantic comedies don't actually exist in real life.

  • My top 5 lessons from hard times

    My top 5 lessons from hard times

    When I started looking for a job 75 years ago, there was record unemployment with little prospect for growth. Kids like me with college backgrounds were a dime a dozen. Times were so bad that people were rioting on Wall Street. Sound familiar? One thing I've learned during my 95 years is that history repeats itself. Also I've learned how to leverage my skills to take advantage of new opportunities That worked for me in the credit-card industry and in offshore oil production. Most recently, I leveraged all that into a career as a business-book author. Here are my Top 5 lessons for navigating dire business straits:

  • McRib is gone. Seven variations you can make at home.

    McRib is gone. Seven variations you can make at home.

    To the dismay of its many fans, the McRib is disappearing from the McDonald's menu. After Nov. 14, McDonald's will no longer offer the pork sandwich nationwide (although some restaurants carry it periodically). Can’t wait for the McRib to come back? Take heart. McDonald’s’ elusuive sandwich is pretty easy to replicate at home. And while you’re at it, why not get creative? Here are our Top 7 homemade McRib sandwiches. All are kitchen-tested, although most of these are more fun to talk about than to eat. Have any brilliant McRib creations of your own? Tell us about it!

  • The evolution of sexual harassment awareness

    The evolution of sexual harassment awareness

    Sexual harassment ranges from annoying to illegal. There was a time when it was "accepted" as a form of hazing, the price of being a woman in the workplace. Teasing, groping, and worse were often tolerated, as was employee termination if a woman didn’t provide sexual favors to her harasser. That began to change as women sought redress through the courts in the 1970s and '80s. A growing body of legal precedents and the passage of laws strengthening the Civil Rights Act have made the threat of a sexual harassment lawsuit a serious financial risk for companies today. Here's a look at some of the legal moves and high-profile cases that have raised awareness of this issue.

  • No spare tire in your new car? Four things you need to know.

    No spare tire in your new car? Four things you need to know.

    You're cruising along in your new car, when bang, there's a flat tire. You do everything you’re supposed to do: Safely maneuver to the side of the road, turn on your hazard lights, lift the hood to indicate car trouble, and open the trunk to get the spare. And it’s not there! In an effort to decrease vehicle weight, increase fuel economy, and allow for more trunk space, manufacturers have been replacing full-size spare tires with smaller, temporary ones. Now, even these are disappearing in some models in favor of a tire repair kit the size of a shoebox. Don’t have a spare tire in your trunk? Here are four things you need to know: 

  • Veterans Day: America's wartime vets, by the numbers

    Veterans Day: America's wartime vets, by the numbers

    Veterans Day (US) and Remembrance Day (British Commonwealth) are observed on Nov. 11, the day in 1918 that an armistice ended hostilities in The Great War. Some 41 million Americans have served in the US military since 1775; 23 million of them are still alive, of whom 17 million served during a conflict. Source: 2010 American Community Survey, Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs

  • What is a short sale? Five things you need to know.

    What is a short sale? Five things you need to know.

    Is a foreclosure staring you in the face? For many Americans faced with foreclosure and, possibly, bankruptcy, a better option is often a short sale. Short sales, which are up 10 percent from the same period last year, according to RealtyTrac, are becoming an increasingly popular way to deal with homes and homeowners burdened with too much debt. However, many homeowners still aren’t clear what a short sale is and whether it is the best solution for them. Here are five things you need to know about short sales: 

  • What the Keystone XL pipeline would mean for the US

    What the Keystone XL pipeline would mean for the US

    The Obama administration announced on Thursday it was delaying construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, a proposed Canadian project so rich in promised jobs, tax revenues, and oil imports that its approval seemed assure. But the proposal to bring crude oil from Alberta’s tar sands to refineries in Texas involved a pipeline traversing America’s heartland, including an environmentally sensitive region atop the vital Ogallala aquifer. Delaying the project to examine an alternative route around the aquifer appears the safest political move for the moment, though it won’t give President Obama immunity from criticism. Here is some background on the pipeline project.

  • 2 of the best novels of 2011

    2 of the best novels of 2011

    Second-guessing awards is as old as competition. Shortly after the first Greek athlete had a crown of laurel placed on his brow at the first Olympics, there no doubt were murmurings in the stands that “Agathon was robbed.” While Julian Barnes finally took home the Man Booker Prize this month after four nominations, the lineup of finalists thoroughly puzzled – if not infuriated – many. No Hollinghurst? No Ondaatje? Well, after reading five of the six nominees, I can safely say, “No Hollinghurst? No Ondaatje?” Both Booker winners have new novels out this October, both are without question among the finest work they’ve done, and both easily trump finalists Stephen Kelman’s “Pigeon English” and A.D. Miller’s “Snowdrops” (sorry, guys). And I’m not just grading on a snob’s curve. Both “The Cat’s Table” and “The Stranger’s Child” win in terms of that dirty word the judges cited that so enraged pretentious folks: “readability.”

  • 10 magnificent "places to see before you die"

    10 magnificent "places to see before you die"

    Wondering where to go on your next vacation – or just want to read about breathtaking sights from all over the globe? The updated edition of "1,000 Places To See Before You Die" spans the globe to compile a list of inspired destinations for the diehard traveler.

  • Europe debt crisis: 3 reasons why China won't help out

    Europe debt crisis: 3 reasons why China won't help out

    Although China, the world's largest creditor, has bought European bonds in the past, experts doubts that it will reach out to help alleviate the Europe debt crisis. There are reasons why it would, and here are three main reasons why it won't:

  • Eurozone crisis: 3 reasons why China might help bail out Europe

    Eurozone crisis: 3 reasons why China might help bail out Europe

    China is the world’s biggest creditor, with foreign exchange reserves of around $3.2 trillion. Europe would like Beijing to use some of that money to lend a hand and help bail out the eurozone. China has stressed it will not be a savior to Europe, and there are a reasons it won't. However, there are a few reasons China could change course and come to the rescue. Here are three:

  • In quotes: 7 Berlusconi memorable moments

    In quotes: 7 Berlusconi memorable moments

    One Italian media sport is to capture outgoing Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s often rambling and controversial foot-in-mouth moments. Reuters and the BBC have also joined in with translations. Here are seven from the past decade:

  • The 50-plus votes and allegations that failed to sink Berlusconi

    The 50-plus votes and allegations that failed to sink Berlusconi

    Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has survived more than 50 no-confidence votes in his political career, surviving yet another at least implicit one on Tuesday. But he is still headed out the door, he says. Over the years, charges of corruption, accusations of soliciting underage prostitutes, and alleged involvement with the mafia were not enough to sink the indomitable Mr. Berlusconi – but charges of mishandling the economic crisis seem to have done it. Here’s a look at the many things that would have taken down many other world leaders.

  • Top children's books for holiday gifts, according to Scholastic Book Clubs and Book Fairs

    Top children's books for holiday gifts, according to Scholastic Book Clubs and Book Fairs

    Whether you're looking for a picture book for a toddler or young adult fiction for a teen, you might want to check out this list by Scholastic Book Clubs and Scholastic Book Fairs. Here are the titles that Scholastic Book Clubs and Scholastic Book Fairs are highlighting as the most popular of the 2011 holiday season.

  • 10 best books of 2011, according to Amazon

    10 best books of 2011, according to Amazon

    It’s a virtually impossible task, but the little elves at Amazon have done it again – compile a list of the Best Books of 2011. Their list includes works by bestselling veterans, award-winning authors, and debut novelists alike, spanning the gamut of genres from literary fiction to young adult to thriller. Your best bet for a holiday gift or the perfect book to curl up with on a winter evening? Start here, with Amazon’s Top 10 Best Books of 2011.

  • Imminent Iran nuclear threat? A timeline of warnings since 1979.

    Imminent Iran nuclear threat? A timeline of warnings since 1979.

    Breathless predictions that the Islamic Republic will soon be at the brink of nuclear capability, or – worse – acquire an actual nuclear bomb, are not new. For more than quarter of a century Western officials have claimed repeatedly that Iran is close to joining the nuclear club. Such a result is always declared "unacceptable" and a possible reason for military action, with "all options on the table" to prevent upsetting the Mideast strategic balance dominated by the US and Israel. And yet, those predictions have time and again come and gone. This chronicle of past predictions lends historical perspective to today’s rhetoric about Iran.

  • Can Bill Clinton's book save the economy? His five best ideas.

    Can Bill Clinton's book save the economy? His five best ideas.

    During Bill Clinton’s presidency, the unemployment rate fell from 7.3 percent to 3.9 percent. The number of people who were unemployed fell by 3.7 million over eight years. Love them or hate them, the Clinton years marked a high water mark for the creation of jobs. On Tuesday, publisher Alfred A. Knopf released the former president’s latest book, “Back to Work,” which is in part a list of ways Mr. Clinton thinks the nation can get its job machine back on track. Here are five suggestions (out of 46) from the silver-haired “man from Hope."

  • Joe Frazier: Is he one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time?

    Joe Frazier: Is he one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time?

    Joe Frazier, who passed away on Nov. 7, held the title of heavyweight champion for nearly five years in the late 1960s and early 1970s. See how Joe Frazier compares with 11 of the greatest heavyweight champions over the past century (with help from the International Boxing Hall of Fame). Who do you consider the best?

  • Top 4 economic obstacles for young people – and ways to cope

    Top 4 economic obstacles for young people – and ways to cope

    The Great Recession hit many people hard, but it is slamming young people now coming into the workforce, the so-called Millennials. "The whole budget is totally stacked against [Millennials]," says Isabel Sawhill, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington. But all is not lost for America's 18-to-29-year-olds. If they are proactive and make smart career moves, young people can avoid setbacks and long-term damage to their careers, earning power, and lifestyle. "An important message is that recovering after a bad start will take quite some time," says Till von Wachter, a Columbia University economist and author of a study on Canadian students' job prospects. "As the labor market recovers, you need to be very watchful and active and search for that better job." Here are four top obstacles facing young people and strategies to help:

  • Iran sanctions 101

    US sanctions on Iran began in 1979, following the Iranian hostage crisis. The first sanctions banned Iranian products other than small gifts, informational materials, food, and “some carpets,” according to Reuters. The UN and EU have since come down with sanctions themselves and broadened their scope. Here's a recap of the sanctions Iran faces now. 

  • 10 best books of 2011, according to Publishers Weekly

    10 best books of 2011, according to Publishers Weekly

    Who reads more books than the review staff at Publishers Weekly? Hardly anyone, and that's why their year-end "10 best list" always attracts attention. With five fiction titles and five nonfiction, here are the 10 books that most impressed the PW readers in 2011. According to their intro, these are the books that "stayed with us, that we talked up, handed around, and of course argued about among ourselves."

  • Osama bin Laden: The truth behind the SEAL raid? Five bombshells.

    Osama bin Laden: The truth behind the SEAL raid? Five bombshells.

    Osama bin Laden was killed in a May raid by Navy SEALs, and Chuck Pfarrer, a former Navy SEAL, commanded the “same outfit” that carried out the strike on the Al Qaeda leader.  In his new book, “Seal Target Geronimo: The Inside Story of the Mission to Kill Osama Bin Laden,” Mr. Pfarrer says he wants to provide what he says are facts that dispel some of the myths that have surrounded the mission, and that have cast the SEALs, he fears, as "spray and pray" commandos intent on killing the terrorist behind the 9/11 attacks. 

 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.