All list articles

  • Meg Whitman new HP CEO. What firm has more CEO change?

    Meg Whitman new HP CEO. What firm has more CEO change?

    Fortune 500 companies are supposed to be stable, rock-solid institutions, where CEO change rarely happens. But it doesn't always happen that way. Just ask Hewlett-Packard, which announced Thursday that Meg Whitman would be the company's new chief executive officer, the fourth HP CEO in six years. In the past six years, only 16 companies on the Fortune 500 or S&P 500 have had three CEOs, according to executive search firm Crist Kolder Associates in Hinsdale, Ill. Besides HP, only two have had four or more. Can you guess who these CEO change champions are? [Editor's note: This story was updated 9/23/2011.]

  • US hikers freed: Timeline of key events

    US hikers freed: Timeline of key events

    The two US hikers remaining in Iranian custody, Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, were released today after more than two years of detention. Here are the key points in their saga.

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/22/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 9/22/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Palestinian UN bid: key moves to watch for

    Palestinian UN bid: key moves to watch for

    At this year’s annual meeting the United Nations General Assembly in New York, one of the most high-profile issues is the Palestinian statehood bid. What is it, and how will it unfold?

  • 3 of the most-talked-about September novels

    3 of the most-talked-about September novels

    In this month's roundup, three acclaimed writers approach the modern problem of isolation in three very different ways.

  • 10 best books of September, according to Amazon's editors

    10 best books of September, according to Amazon's editors

    From the history of fonts to the unexpected consequences of a wild baseball throw, Amazon editors' picks for best books of the month include a lively mix of titles. Here are a few of the September books that Amazon's staff ranked the highest.

  • Top 5 ways to save on a honeymoon destination

    Top 5 ways to save on a honeymoon destination

    So you’re about to tie the knot. Let me offer my congratulations! I do worry, though, about your bank account. Getting married is one of the costliest decisions of your life (financially, I mean). I remember the after-effects of our wedding on our finances … shock sums it up nicely. I don’t mean the wedding, which itself can cost a small fortune (an average $18,000, says the website Wedding Report). I mean the honeymoon. As someone who has researched honeymoon destinations and watched others decide their post-nuptials in exciting and different ways, I’ve compiled money-saving hints to keep you from incurring too much debt. Here are my Top 5 money-saving tips for a honeymoon destination:

  • Death penalty: Top 5 countries to execute the most people

    According to Amnesty International’s annual Death Sentences and Executions report, at least 527 people were executed in 23 countries in 2010, plus thousands in China. The number of people executed worldwide since 2007 is more than 2,500. Here are the five countries registering the most executions since 2007:

  • Five US states that use the death penalty most

    Five US states that use the death penalty most

    It's not often that the US Supreme Court stays an execution, as it did late Thursday in the case of convicted murderer Duane Buck. But the justices routinely consider such requests, given that 34 states permit capital punishment. Since 1999, when a record 99 inmates were put to death, the number of executions has dropped slightly, according to the Death Penalty Information Center, which opposes capital punishment. Can you guess which five states had the most executions over the past four years?

  • Dakota Meyer and nine others: what they did to receive the Medal of Honor

    Dakota Meyer and nine others: what they did to receive the Medal of Honor

    Dakota Meyer among soldiers who distinguished themselves: For going above and beyond the call of duty, Marine Sgt. Dakota Meyer was awarded Thursday the Medal of Honor, the US government’s highest military decoration. He joins nine other distinguished soldiers who received the award for service in the Iraq or Afghanistan wars. Take a look at these men who risked their lives to protect America.

  • 3 questions US forces must answer before declaring victory in Libya

    3 questions US forces must answer before declaring victory in Libya

    Even as fighting in Libya continues, Pentagon officials and US commanders overseeing operations on the ground are wrestling with tough questions about the future of the campaign – and what military forces still need to do before they can consider it a victory. Here are the top three:

  • "One City, One Book" – what 5 cities chose to read

    "One City, One Book" – what 5 cities chose to read

    Collective reading is alive and well in the 2000s – thanks to large-scale online book clubs (think "One Book, One Twitter," for example) and also to community “One City, One Book” programs which encourage an entire metropolis to read the same book at the same time. What are cities reading this year? Here are the 2011 picks of five participating cities – all of them apparently drawn to books with strong cultural themes .

  • 5 reasons "The Night Circus" is everywhere

    5 reasons "The Night Circus" is everywhere

    If you've read a newspaper or been anywhere online in the past few weeks, chances are you've seen the distinctive black cover of "The Night Circus" by Erin Morgenstern. Here are five reasons that this book is suddenly popping up wherever you go.

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/15/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 9/15/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Miss Universe 2011: Angola's Leila Lopes becomes fourth African winner

    Miss Universe 2011: Angola's Leila Lopes becomes fourth African winner

    Miss Universe 2011 Leila Lopes hails from the southern African nation of Angola. She's only the fourth African to win the title since the beginning of the worldwide pageant. She’s only the second African of African descent to win.

  • World's cheapest gas: Top 10 countries

    World's cheapest gas: Top 10 countries

    While Americans and Europeans  bemoan the cost of gasoline at the pumps, people in some other parts of the world enjoy filling up their tanks cheaply thanks to subsidies provided by wealthy, oil-rich governments. But fuel subsidies tend to benefit the rich (who own motor vehicles) more than the poor. The IMF estimated that 65 percent of the fuel subsidies in Africa benefit the richest 40 percent of households (2010). Only 8 percent of the $410 billion in government fuel subsidies worldwide went to the poorest 20 percent of the population (International Energy Agency - estimates, 2010). The British insurance firm Staveley Head has released the latest list of the world’s gas pump prices. Here are the 10 cheapest countries on Earth to fill a gas tank.

  • Five ways 9/11 has transformed the US military

    Five ways 9/11 has transformed the US military

    The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, fundamentally transformed the way the United States military wages war. With the invasion of Afghanistan and, months later, Iraq on the heels of 9/11, the wars have caused the Pentagon to rethink the way it fights, how it spends money in times of crisis, and what it values in both its highest and lowest-ranking commanders. The Monitor asked experts to weigh in on the Top 5 ways in which 9/11 has changed the US military.

  • 2 debut novels worth drooling over

    2 debut novels worth drooling over

    This fall is crowded with new releases from literary heavyweights from Tom Perrotta and Jeffrey Eugenides to Joan Didion and Haruki Marukami. But it also offers two new names worth searching out: Erin Morgenstern and Chad Harbach, both of whose debut novels offer readers a chance to dive into fully realized worlds. In one, it’s a 19th-century traveling circus that’s open only at night; in the other, it’s a Midwestern baseball field. Both novels feature protagonists who are the very best at what they do. (Morgenstern and Harbach are no slouches, either.)

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound

    Bestselling books the week of 9/9/11, according to IndieBound

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America

  • Fall books: 12 fiction titles you don't want to miss

    Fall books: 12 fiction titles you don't want to miss

    From Ireland to India, and from the year AD 73 to the possible end of the world, here are 12 of the most enticing of the fall 2011 fiction titles.

  • Crunch time at Postal Service: Five questions about post office closings.

    Crunch time at Postal Service: Five questions about post office closings.

    Among the thousands of post offices under review for closure is a cramped branch in downtown Elmira, N.Y., bustling on a rainy summer afternoon. It was, until recently, a place retiree Charlotte Dumas took for granted. She visits the downtown branch about three times a week. "I would hate to see it close," she says. "It's so convenient." And it's a bargain. The United States Postal Service (USPS) delivers an average of 563 million pieces of mail a day, six days a week. For a 44-cent stamp, you can send a letter to the far reaches of the nation. Rain, sleet, and manic dogs don't stop the service, which carries mail by pack mule to the Havasupai Indian reservation at the bottom of the Grand Canyon and operates branches in towns of fewer than 100 residents. Too good to be true? It might soon be. To help close a $20 billion revenue shortfall by 2015, the USPS may be forced to shutter as many as 3,700 post offices nationwide.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • The world's top universities in 2011

    For the second year in a row, the United Kingdom’s University of Cambridge topped America’s Harvard University in the annual QS ranking of the world’s top universities. Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), a UK-based higher education consulting firm, released its much-anticipated list of the top 300 today. Academic reputation – a subjective assessment – accounts for 40 percent of the score that determines where schools end up on the rankings. You can get a closer look at the methodology here. This year’s top 10 dropped American universities Princeton and California Institute of Technology in favor of two other leading US schools. You can check out last year’s top 10 here and explore why QS’s rankings caused such a stir.

  • Stock prices tumbling? Four ways to control your risk.

    Stock prices tumbling? Four ways to control your risk.

    If the wild plunges and rebounds in stock prices have made a yo-yo of your portfolio, welcome to a very big club. The gyrations in stock markets worldwide have forced investors everywhere to confront an uncomfortable reality: Short of stuffing your money in a bank or under your mattress, you have to cope with volatility and risk. Fortunately, there are ways to tame risk – even turn it to your advantage. Here are four steps that you can take to begin to reduce the risk of falling stock prices for your long-term portfolio: