Subscribe
First Look

Say what you will about Shaunae Miller's dive, but it was legal

Some observers didn't like the way Bahamian runner Shaunae Miller dove to victory in the women's 400 meter track and field final, but there was nothing illegal about it.

  • close
    The image provided by OMEGA on Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, shows the photo finish of the women's 400-meter final when Bahamas' Shaunae Miller (bottom r.) falls over the finish line to win gold ahead of United States' silver medal winner Allyson Felix (top r.), and Jamaica's bronze medal winner Shericka Jackson (l.) during the athletics competitions of 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro.
    OMEGA Timing/AP
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

It has garnered both controversy and praise, an unconventional finish to the women’s 400 meters final in the Rio de Janeiro Olympics that earned Shaunae Miller from the Bahamas a gold medal.

Late on Monday night, Miller was hurtling down the final stretch, barely a whisker ahead of Allyson Felix from the United States, when she vaulted from the ground and crossed the finish line in a spectacular dive. It was not immediately apparent who had won, so close had the runners been as they tore through the closing stage of the race.

But the result eventually became clear. And, much as some have criticized the manner of Miller’s victory, there can be no doubt that her action was entirely in accord with the rules.

“The first athlete whose torso (as distinguished from the head, neck, arms, legs, hands or feet) reaches the vertical plane of the closest edge of the finish line,” note the rules for the Rio games, “is the winner.”

That’s it. Nothing about feet staying on the ground, no prohibition of diving or crossing the line in an airborne fashion.

Much of the dismay expressed in the hours since stems as much as anything from the nature of the athlete pushed into second place, one who has been variously described as a person whom “nobody dislikes” and one who has “shown class every single time.”

Indeed, in an NBC interview the day after the event, world class sprinter Felix displayed no bitterness or anger at the manner of her defeat, explaining instead how she hoped to communicate a positive message to young women who might look to her as a role model.

“You’re going to have obstacles, there’s going to be adversity, but let your spirit shine through,” said Felix. “No matter how the cards are stacked against you, don’t let that get you down.”

Aside from having won an Olympic silver medal, Felix has reason to be cheerful: that medal brings her total to seven, more than any US woman in history.

Ironically, when another Olympic final finished in such a fashion – back in 2008 – the shoe was on the other foot, in terms of the nations involved, as NBC pointed out in a Twitter post. 

Nor is it the first time at the 2016 Olympics that a race has ended in so nail-biting a manner, with a strong favorite defeated at the final push. Just a few days before Miller’s dive, the odds-on winner of the 200-meter backstroke, Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu, was eased into second place by Maya DiRado of the US – a victory snatched by a margin of 0.06 seconds.

And with regard to Miller of the Bahamas, many observers underscore the fact that there was nothing wrong with what she did – it was simply unconventional.

“What Miller did took guts,” writes Jason Diamond for Rolling Stone. “She didn't cheat, she just didn't win it the normal way.”

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK