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Ahmadinejad abruptly sacks foreign minister in favor of nuclear chief

Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad replaced Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki in a move that is likely to solidify Iran's united front toward the West.

By Staff Writer / December 13, 2010

In this July 29, 2008, file photo, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (r.) listens to his foreign minister, Manouchehr Mottaki, during the inaugural ceremony of the 15th Non-Aligned Movement Foreign Ministerial meeting in Tehran, Iran. Ahmadinejad fired Mottaki on Monday, Dec. 13, replacing him with nuclear chief Ali Akbar Salehi.

Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP/File

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Istanbul, Turkey

Iran’s arch-conservative president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, summarily fired his foreign minister on Monday, replacing him with atomic chief Ali Akbar Salehi.

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The jilted Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki was in Senegal on an official visit when Mr. Ahmadinejad thanked him for his “diligence and services” in a terse statement. He said he hoped Mr. Mottaki’s “efforts receive praise by God and [that] you will be successful in the rest of your life,” according to the official IRNA news agency.

Though the Foreign Ministry does not craft Iran's nuclear policy – negotiations are conducted by the head of the Supreme National Security Council, and all final decisions made by Iran's supreme religious leader – the move is likely to solidify the united front the regime tries to portray toward the West.

Mottaki's replacement long rumored

The decision to remove Mottaki has long been rumored, especially since Ahmadinejad several months ago appointed a group of regional foreign policy envoys, in parallel – and in apparent competition with – the Foreign Ministry. Mottaki was reported to have offered to resign at the time.

“This is the right move … for President Ahmadinejad, because he is sending the right signal to the West that Iran is trying to change its foreign policy and strategy,” Ghanbar Naderi, a Tehran analyst, told Al Jazeera English.

“[Ahmadinejad] is so desperate to have somebody there who knows how to talk to the West. And we are in a very critical situation now,” says Mr. Naderi. “The conservative government wants to make sure that somehow there will be a resolution to Iran’s nuclear program before Ahmadinejad’s term is finished over the next two years.”

Nuclear chief to take over

Mr. Salehi, the nuclear chief, was named interim foreign minister on Monday. Conservative news agencies in Iran, however, suggested that his deputy in Iran’s atomic energy organization would move into the top slot and Saleh would stay on at the Foreign Ministry.

Salehi has overseen the growth of Iran’s nuclear program into one with thousands of centrifuges spinning to enrich uranium, and in the past year the enrichment of uranium from 3.5 percent to nearly 20 percent purity – which Iran hailed as key stride in its nuclear development.

Prior to being appointed foreign minister in August 2005, Mottaki had supported one of Ahmadinejad’s top conservative rivals, Ali Larijani, who today is speaker of parliament and locked in power struggles of his own with the president.

Ahmadinejad stepping beyond his role?

Ahmadinejad has ignored a number of decisions by the parliament that are meant to be binding on his office, according to Iran’s Constitution. Even fellow conservatives have complained at Ahmadinejad’s definition of his role, as second in the country only to Iran’s supreme religious leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

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