Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Tropical storm Wutip hammers Vietnam, Thailand (+video)

Tropical storm Wutip damaged at least 1,000 homes as it made landfall in Vietnam. Tropical storm Wutip, downgraded from a typhoon, sank three Chinese ships and 74 people are missing.

By Sui-Lee Wee, Amy Sawitta Lefevre, and Ho Binh MinhReuters / September 30, 2013


Beijing, Bangkok, and Hanoi

Seventy-four Chinese fishermen were missing on Monday after a typhoon sunk three fishing boats in the South China Sea as Thailand and Vietnam braced for torrential rain and flooding.

Skip to next paragraph

The ships were hit by Typhoon Wutip on Sunday as they navigated gales near the Paracel Islands, about 330 km from China's island province of Hainan, state news agency Xinhua said, citing sources with the Hainan maritime search and rescue center.

Rescuers had rescued 14 survivors, the sources said. The boats were sailing from the southern province of Guangdong.

Rains and strong winds from the storm are lashed Vietnam on Monday before hitting Thailand on Tuesday.

By the time Wutip made landfall in Vietnam, the typhoon had weakened to a tropical storm, with winds of 73 miles per hours. Media reports estimate that more than 1,000 homes were damaged.

Thai officials warned that more heavy rains could inundate already flood-hit areas of the northeast. At least 22 people have been killed in this year's flooding.

"We're expecting more floods," Teerat Ratanasevi, a government spokesman, told reporters on Monday. "Soldiers have been asked to help evacuate people trapped in flood zones."

Authorities in central Vietnam have moved children and elderly people to schools and other more solid buildings ahead of the storm.

In the central province of Quang Tri, an estimated 82,000 people would need to be evacuated if Wutip made a direct hit, a government statement said.

Vietnam said heavy rain had been falling in several central provinces while flooding and landslides could strike the region later this week.

Typhoons gather strength from warm sea water and tend to dissipate after making landfall. They frequently hit Taiwan, Japan, the Philippines, Hong Kong and southern China during a typhoon season that lasts from early summer to late autumn.

Earlier this month, Typhoon Usagi killed at least 33 people in the Philippines, Taiwan, and China.

(Editing by Nick Macfie)

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Endeavor Global, cofounded by Linda Rottenberg (here at the nonprofit’s headquarters in New York), helps entrepreneurs in emerging markets.

Linda Rottenberg helps people pursue dreams – and create thousands of jobs

She's chief executive of Endeavor Global, a nonprofit group that gives a leg up to budding entrepreneurs.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!