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Usain Bolt: The most successful athlete in world championships

Usain Bolt won three gold medals at the World Championships, bringing his career medal count to 10 (eight golds, two silver). Usain Bolt took gold in the 100- and 200-meter races, as well as the 4X100-meter relay.

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"It gets harder every year as I get older but I'm proud of myself and my team mates and I'll continue to work as hard as I can to dominate for as long as possible," Bolt said.

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HORRIBLY WRONG

America's women also got it horribly wrong, although they managed a super-human recovery to claim bronze.

English Gardner had come to a complete standstill by the time she finally collected the baton for the third leg but a brilliant bend and an astounding last leg by Octavious Freeman took the U.S. through half the field for an initial bronze behind France.

By then Jamaica's quartet of Carrie Russell, Kerron Stewart, Schillonie Calvert and Fraser-Pryce were celebrating their win in 41.29, second only to America's 40.82 set at last year's Olympics and inside the drug-fueled 41.37 of East Germany that stood for 27 years.

Hours later officials disqualified France for a changeover violation, promoting the U.S. to silver to give Britain the bronze and some consolation for the men's team's DQ.

Having become the fourth-fastest 1,500m runner of all time last month, Kiprop started hot favourite and nobody could live with his long-striding acceleration over the last 200 metres as he triumphed in 3:36.28.

American Matthew Centrowitz took silver and South African Johan Cronje a surprise bronze as both men finished strongly.

Sum's victory was much less expected as her late burst denied Russia's Mariya Savinova back-to-back 800m titles.

She took gold in 1:57.38, ahead of Savinova (1:57.80). Brenda Martinez grabbed third as she overhauled compatriot Alysia Johnson Montano, who had run a brave front-running race but ended fourth, flat on the track and sobbing uncontrollably.

Tamgho was already leading when he landed two fouls around the 18-metre mark before nailing the breakthrough distance with his last. Only American Kenny Harrison (18.09) and Jonathan Edwards, with his 1995 world record of 18.29 and 18.16 from the same Gothenburg world championships, have jumped longer.

Pedro Pablo Pichardo of Cuba took silver with 17.68 and American Will Claye was third on 17.52, well clear of out-of-sorts compatriot and world and Olympic champion Christian Taylor in a frustrated fourth.

After years of agonising near misses, an emotional Obergfoell took her first major javelin title at the age of 31 after throwing a season's best 69.05 metres.

Defending champion Maria Abakumova could only manage 65.09 behind surprise Australian runner-up Kimberly Mickle (66.60), to match the bronze her husband Dmitri Tarabin won in the men's final.

Obergfoell had previously won two silvers as well as finishing second and third at the last two Olympics.

Russia topped the medal table with seven golds, though the Americans will promote themselves top under their counting system after finishing second on six but also gathering a mountain of 14 silvers in a total of 25.

Jamaica also had six golds with Kenya on five, Germany four and Ethiopia and Britain both on three.

After signing off with a near-full house on Sunday following a week of poor crowds, the IAAF will be delighted to send their showpiece event to Beijing in 2015 and London two years later as returning to the most recent Olympic stadiums should guarantee healthy attendances throughout.

(Editing by Ed Osmond)

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