Once the conflict's center, Kandahar City calms

The province has seen a 75 percent drop in insurgent attacks and activity compared with the same time last year, according to the Kandahar governor's office in Afghanistan.

By , Correspondent

  • close
    Smoke rises from a building during a gun battle between Taliban members and government forces in Kandahar City on Monday afternoon, July 9. Police managed to kill all 14 suicide bombers involved in the attack, but the fighting left three policemen dead and 18 injured. Six civilians were also injured.
    View Caption

Taliban insurgents attacked the police headquarters and several parts of Kandahar City on Monday afternoon in the sort of attack that's grown less frequent in this once turbulent southern city.

Police managed to kill all 14 suicide bombers involved in the attack, but the fighting left three policemen dead and 18 injured. Six civilians were also injured.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which was part of the group’s regular warm weather offensive, said Qari Yousef Ahmadi, a spokesman for the Taliban. He added that the date of this attack was also meant to come near the one year anniversary of the assassination of President Hamid Karzai’s half-brother, Ahmad Wali, formerly one of the most prominent figures in southern Afghanistan. Ahmad Wali was killed by someone from his inner circle on July 12 of last year.

Recommended: How well do you know Afghanistan? Take our quiz.

In the wake of Ahmad Wali's death, many Kandaharis were concerned his absence would create a power vacuum that would increase violence here. So far, however, the security apparatus, namely the new police chief, Abdul Raziq, has stepped in to fill the void. While a controversial figure, many locals have attributed Mr. Raziq's aggressive approach with bringing a measure of calm to Kandahar.

During the past several months, though security incidents remain a part of regular life for residents, most say they have seen a marked improvement in security and now enjoy much greater freedom of movement. Still, residents say that it remains unclear if the security gains will endure beyond the end of the US and NATO combat mission in 2014.

“Compared to last year there is no doubt that the situation is better, but still there are problems. It’s not long-term security. As soon as foreign troops leave, I’m sure there will be insecurity again,” says Ahmad Shah Spar, an independent political analyst in Kandahar. Mr. Spar says that his biggest concern after international forces leave is a civil war.

By the numbers, Kandahar looks much better than it has in the past. According to officials in the office of Kandahar’s governor, so far this year the province has seen a 75 percent drop in insurgent attacks and activity compared with the same time last year.

For the insurgency, an important aspect of attacks like Monday’s remains grabbing headlines and showing that it is still in a position of strength despite its apparent difficulties maintaining the same level of violence it has in the past, say Kandahar officials.

“They are doing these attacks just to show their influence. I think it will not be a challenge to the security,” says Mohammed Omar Satai, head of the Joint Secretariat of the Kandahar Peace Committee. The attacks do have a psychological effect, however, especially when they manage to target something like the police headquarters. Mr. Satai adds, “Whenever they are not able to take care of their own security, how will they protect other people?”

In a further effort to control appearances, the Taliban seem to be making a concerted effort to capitalize on the US decision to end combat operations here, saying that the effectiveness of their insurgency was the motivating factor for international troops.

“The leadership of the Taliban is taking advantage of the announcement that the Americans will withdraw after 2014. They are saying we have to fight now because they are very close to being defeated,” says Haji Agha Lali Dastgiri, a member of the Kandahar Provincial Council.

Share this story:
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...