Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Japan braces for North Korean missile launch

Japan has threatened to shoot down the rocket if it passes over Japanese airspace. In 1998, North Korea sent a missile over Japan's main island.

(Page 2 of 2)



"We decided to extend by one year a measure that prohibits North Korean ships from calling at Japanese ports and another measure that bans imports and exports with the North," the chief cabinet secretary, Osamu Fujimura, told reporters last week.
 
Japan and the North have long had difficult relations. The North has never forgiven Japan for its 1910-1945 occupation of the Korean peninsula, while Japan continues to demand the return of what it claims are at least a dozen citizens who were abducted by North Korean agents during the cold war. The North's former leader, Kim Jong-il, allowed five abductees to return to Japan in 2001. The regime insisted it had abducted 13 Japanese, and that the remaining eight had died.

Skip to next paragraph

On Tuesday, space officials in North Korea dismissed claims that the rocket was part of the country's ballistic missile program as "nonsense."

Ryu Kum Chol, deputy director of the space development department of the Korean Committee for Space Technology, said it would require a bigger payload to have any use as a missile.

"Our satellite weighs 100 kilograms. For a weapon, a 100-kilogram payload wouldn't be very effective," he told a group of foreign reporters in the capital Pyongyang. "No country in the world would want to launch a ballistic missile from such an open site.

He added: "All the assembly and preparations of the satellite launch are done."

The regime took the unusual step of inviting foreign journalists to observe the launch site at Tongchang-ri in North Phyongan Province. Reports from the scene said all three stages of the Unha-3 rocket were visible; journalists were also show what officials claimed was a satellite ready for installation.

The launch has practically sunk a deal that would have given the impoverished North access to tens of thousands of tons of US food aid in return for halting its nuclear and missile programs under a deal reached at the end of February.

Preparation for a nuclear test?

Satellite images released this week also show evidence of a new tunnel being dug at a site in Punggye-ri, where nuclear tests were conducted in 2006 and 2009, adding to concerns about the North's activity. The National Institute for Defense Studies in Tokyo has warned that North Korea's progress on nuclear technology, coupled with recent regime change, has increased the risk of conflict breaking out in the region.

Some North Korea experts believe the country could use a possible third nuclear test to put it in a stronger position in any future nuclear negotiations with the US.

"If North Korea conducts a third nuclear test, it will not so much be to demonstrate its power to its people as a way of creating stability for the regime," says Professor Shin Jong-dae at the University of North Korean Studies in Seoul. "More important than that, it would be sending a message to the international community, and in particular to the United States, using pressure to make clear that it wants dialog with the US."

The North has not commented on speculation that it is preparing to conduct a nuclear test, although controlled underground nuclear explosions followed long-range rocket launches in 2006 and 2009.

Get daily or weekly updates from CSMonitor.com delivered to your inbox. Sign up today.

Permissions

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Editors' picks

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Endeavor Global, cofounded by Linda Rottenberg (here at the nonprofit’s headquarters in New York), helps entrepreneurs in emerging markets.

Linda Rottenberg helps people pursue dreams – and create thousands of jobs

She's chief executive of Endeavor Global, a nonprofit group that gives a leg up to budding entrepreneurs.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!