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Keep Tim Tebow? Why this Broncos fan doesn't want Peyton Manning.

Tim Tebow is surely gone now that Peyton Manning is a member of the Denver Broncos. But not all Bronco Nation is sold on trading Tim Tebow.  

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But for Broncos fans, Super Bowl success is not yet a distant memory. We had a Hall of Fame quarterback as recently as the late 1990s, when John Elway led the team to back-to-back Super Bowl titles. Desperation hasn't yet set in.

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Elway, who is now vice president of football operations for the Broncos, knows better than most what it takes to win in the NFL. Before his two Super Bowl victories, No. 7 threw 52 orange-jersied Lilliputians on his broad shoulders and led them to three Super Bowl appearances.

Now, a decade later, the league is even more quarterback-centric: the 2001 Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens, with their wrecking-ball defense and merely a caretaker quarterback, seem like relics of a different era. The past nine Super Bowl-winning teams have been led by the following names: Brady, Brady, Roethlisberger, Manning (Peyton), Manning (Eli), Roethlisberger, Brees, Rodgers, Manning (Eli again). All elite quarterbacks; most, if not all, destined for Canton.

It's not every day such a singular talent falls from the sky – Manning is the greatest commodity to hit the open market since Apple went public. So it would be easy to say "yes," and the Broncos have.

And yet what of relentlessly positive Tebow? It doesn't feel right kicking him to the curb. As an unabashed Christian he has been polarizing. And yet he is the ultimate company man, representing his organization with class and dignity. Plus, winning with homegrown talent always seems more satisfying than with a hired gun.

And what about what Tebow did last season? He was supposed to be a stopgap – a bone thrown to the fans. He was supposed to fail and the Broncos would move on. But he didn't fail. He led the Broncos to one of the more improbable and inspiring division titles in recent memory.

Was it always Hall-of-Fame caliber offensive football? Certainly not. But it was gripping stuff. And his 80-yard pass to beat the Pittsburgh Steelers on the first play of overtime in the first round of the playoffs gave us one of the great moments in Bronco history.

So: guaranteed success for a handful of years, or possible ups with many likely downs through 2025?  

It's a no-brainer.

I'll take Tebow.

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