Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Tim Tebow: Where does he go now? Four teams that might fit.

Tim Tebow is surely gone now that Peyton Manning has chosen to join the Denver Broncos. The question now is whether any team wants to adapt itself to the Tim Tebow style. 

(Page 2 of 2)



Many still chide the Jaguars for not drafting Tebow when they had the chance in 2010. The team’s new owner, Shahid Kahn, has said that he would “100 percent” have drafted Tebow two years ago if he had been in charge. Even while Tebow was in Colorado, he was still the biggest celebrity in Jacksonville – his No. 15 Broncos jersey is a more common sight across north Florida jerseys of any current Jaguars player.

Skip to next paragraph

Now that he looks to be available again, fan pressure on the Jaguars’ new front office will again head into overdrive.

There are plenty of reasons why Jacksonville trading for Tebow wouldn’t be a good move.

New head coach Mike Mularkey is looking to build a passing game around first-year quarterback Blaine Gabbert. The team also recently acquired backup quarterback Chad Henne in free agency to compete with Gabbert. No one in the Jaguars camp has expressed any public interest in Tebow, so far.

But Gabbert had a disastrous rookie season in 2011. While part of his ineffectiveness can be blamed on the fact that he was working with a poor corps of wide receiver, the Jaguars' attempts to remedy that problem in free agency so far haven’t yielded much.

So from a football standpoint, Tebow wouldn't be a terrible fit for the Jaguars. They have a decent offensive line, a huge running threat in franchise Pro Bowl back Maurice Jones-Drew, and a top kicker in Josh Scobee. (The strong leg of Bronco Matt Prater sealed many of Tebow's comeback wins last year.)

But the bigger argument for bringing Tebow home is an emotional one.

Even as a backup, he’d give Jaguars fans something to be excited about after a solid decade of perpetual disappointment. It would garner the city of Jacksonville some national attention, perking up ticket sales after years of poor attendance. The malaise over the franchise is such that rumors of the team eventually packing up and moving to a bigger market, like Los Angeles, are regular and rampant.  

Monday morning, Colin Cowherd on ESPN Radio called Jacksonville one the top three "least optimistic" NFL cities, saying that even amid the sense of hope that the offseason can generate, Jaguars fans have "nothing to be excited about." 

If Tebow didn’t pan out, it would be the latest in a long string of poor offseason moves by the Jaguars, who haven’t been taken seriously in a long time. But if he did work out, even a little bit, Kahn, Malarkey and company would be heroes, and the First Coast would be relevant to professional football again.  

As Kahn said of Tebow back in January, “there comes a time where emotion trumps rationality and this, if I was an owner, would be one of those moments for me.”

The argument for the Jaguars signing Tebow might not make a lot of sense, but as we’ve seen time and again, Tebow has a way of turning conventional wisdom on its head.

How much do you know about Tim Tebow? Take our quiz.

Get daily or weekly updates from CSMonitor.com delivered to your inbox. Sign up today.

Permissions

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!