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Frank Gifford produced on the field and on television, too (+video)

The former NFL All-Pro running back with the New York Giants also starred as a broadcaster for ABC Sports.

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    In this 1958 file photo, New York Giants halfback Frank Gifford participates in a workout in New York. In a statement released by NBC News on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015, his family said Gifford died suddenly at his Connecticut home of natural causes that morning.
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An NFL championship with the New York Giants. An Emmy award as television's "outstanding sports personality." Induction in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Frank Gifford, as well known for being a buffer for fellow announcers Don Meredith and Howard Cosell on "Monday Night Football" as for his versatility as a player, died Sunday. He was 84.

In a statement released by NBC News, his family said Gifford died suddenly at his Connecticut home of natural causes. His wife, Kathie Lee Gifford, is a host for NBC's "Today."

"We rejoice in the extraordinary life he was privileged to live, and we feel grateful and blessed to have been loved by such an amazing human being," his family said in the statement. "We ask that our privacy be respected at this difficult time and we thank you for your prayers."

A running back, defensive back, wide receiver and special teams player in his career, Gifford was the NFL's MVP in 1956, when the Giants won the title. He went to the Pro Bowl at three positions and was the centerpiece of a Giants offense that went to five NFL title games in the 1950s and '60s.

Beginning in 1971, he worked for ABC's "Monday Night Football," at first as a play-by-play announcer and then an analyst, winning his Emmy in 1976-77.

"Frank's talent and charisma on the field and on the air were important elements in the growth and popularity of the modern NFL," Commissioner Roger Goodell said.

Later in life, Gifford stayed in the spotlight through his marriage to Kathie Lee Gifford, who famously called him a "human love machine" and "lamb-chop" to her millions of viewers.

"He was a great friend to everyone in the league, a special adviser to NFL commissioners, and served NFL fans with enormous distinction for so many decades," Goodell added.

Gifford hosted "Wide World of Sports," covered several Olympics — his call of Franz Klammer's downhill gold medal run in 1976 is considered a broadcasting masterpiece — and announced 588 consecutive NFL games for ABC, not even taking time off after the death of his mother shortly before a broadcast in 1986.

"Frank Gifford was an exceptional man who will be missed by everyone who had the joy of seeing his talent on the field, the pleasure of watching his broadcasts, or the honor of knowing him," said Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company, which owns ABC.

While he worked with others, including Dan Dierdorf, Al Michaels, Joe Namath and O.J. Simpson, Gifford was most known for the eight years he served as a calming influence between the folksy Meredith and acerbic Cosell.

In its early years the show was a cultural touchstone, with cities throwing parades for the visiting announcers and celebrities such as John Lennon and Ronald Reagan making appearances.

"I hate to use the words 'American institution,' but there's no other way to put it, really," Gifford told The Associated Press in 1993. "There's nothing else like it."

A straight-shooter who came off as earnest and sincere, Gifford was popular with viewers, though some accused him of being a shill for the NFL.

Gifford had his best year in 1956, rushing for 819 yards, picking up 603 yards receiving and scoring nine touchdowns in 12 games. The Giants routed the Bears 47-7 at Yankee Stadium, where Gifford shared a locker with Mickey Mantle.

"Frank Gifford was the ultimate Giant," co-owner John Mara said. "He was the face of our franchise for so many years."

Born Aug. 16, 1930, in Santa Monica, Calif., Frank Newton Gifford was the son of an itinerant oil worker.

Gifford's 5,434 yards receiving were a Giants record for 39 years, until Amani Toomer surpassed him in 2003. His jersey number, 16, was retired by the team in 2000.

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