Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Was Newt Gingrich really all that close to Ronald Reagan?

In GOP debates, Newt Gingrich has mentioned Ronald Reagan more than all the other candidates combined. A pro-Romney ad accuses the ex-speaker of exaggerating his relationship.

(Page 2 of 2)



Those were years when Democrats in Congress fought bitterly with the Reagan White House over the latter’s efforts to halt Soviet adventurism in the Third World. Remember the Nicaraguan Contras? Mr. Abrams does, and he does not remember Gingrich helping much as Reagan fought to maintain Contras funding.

Skip to next paragraph

Recent posts

“Mr. Gingrich voted with the president regularly, but equally often spewed insulting rhetoric at Reagan, his top aides, and his policies to defeat Communism. Gingrich was voluble and certain in predicting that Reagan ‘s policies would fail, and in all of this he was dead wrong,” Abrams writes.

(Yes, yes, we remember Iran-Contra too – but that’s not what we’re talking about at the moment.)

Abrams resurrects a particularly unfortunate (for Gingrich) quote from 1985, in which the then-congressman called a looming meeting between Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev “the most dangerous summit for the West since Adolf Hitler met with Neville Chamberlain in 1938 in Munich.”

Now, whether GOP primary voters will care about this tiff over the long-ago is something else entirely. It’s certainly not cooling their enthusiasm for Gingrich at the moment: according to Gallup, Gingrich has erased Romney’s 23-point national lead among Republicans in one week.

That’s not a swing in support. It’s a stampede.

“The two candidates are now essentially tied,” writes Gallup editor Frank Newport.

Plus, Gingrich has a pretty big hammer of his own to swing at Romney. Or rather, the pro-Gingrich "super PAC" Winning Our Future does. This organization is spending $6 million to run an ad that depicts Romney as a moderate and progressive. Among other things, the ad asserts “Mitt Romney invented government-run health care.”

Ouch. That’s got to worry the Romney campaign.

Get daily or weekly updates from CSMonitor.com delivered to your inbox. Sign up today.

Permissions

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!