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Why Donald Trump calls Obama the 'founder of ISIS'

Donald Trump repeated the allegation four times in a speech in Florida Wednesday. Trump also pointedly referred to the president by his full legal name: Barack Hussein Obama.

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    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds a sign during a campaign rally at the BB&T Center in Sunrise, Fla. on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016.
    (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
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Donald Trump is now accusing President Barack Obama of founding the Islamic State group that is wreaking havoc from the Middle East to European cities.

"In many respects, you know, they honor President Obama," Trump said Wednesday during a raucous campaign rally outside Fort Lauderdale, Florida. "He is the founder of ISIS."

He repeated the allegation three more times for emphasis.

Trump also pointedly referred to the president by his full legal name: Barack Hussein Obama.

On Thursday, when asked in an interview with CNBC  whether it was appropriate for him to call the sitting president of the United States the founder of a terrorist organization that wants to kill Americans, Trump doubled down on his accusation.

The Republican presidential nominee in the past has accused his opponent, Democrat Hillary Clinton, of founding the militant group. Shifting the blame to Obama on Wednesday, he said "crooked Hillary Clinton" was actually the group's co-founder.

As he works to keep his campaign message on track, Trump in recent days has sometimes tried to clarify controversial statements by arguing he was being misinterpreted. But given the opportunity Thursday morning to walk his statement back, Trump did the opposite.

"He was the founder, absolutely the founder," Trump said on CNBC. "In fact he gets the — in sports, they have awards. He gets the most valuable player award."

Trump blamed the president for his decision to withdraw troops, which some argue created a power vacuum in which extremist groups like ISIS thrive. Trump says the U.S. "should have never gotten in" the war, but also shouldn't "have got out the way he got out."

Trump now claims that he was opposed to the Iraq War from the beginning, despite evidence to the contrary.

Trump has long blamed Obama and his former secretary of state — Clinton — for pursuing Mideast policies that created a power vacuum in Iraq that was exploited by IS, another acronym for the group. He's sharply criticized Obama for announcing he would pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, a decision that many Obama critics say created the kind of instability in which extremist groups like IS thrive.

The White House declined to comment on Trump's accusation.

The Islamic State group began as Iraq's local affiliate of al-Qaida, the group that attacked the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001. The group carried out massive attacks against Iraq's Shiite Muslim majority, fueling tensions with al-Qaida's central leadership. The local group's then-leader, Jordanian-born Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was killed in 2006 in a U.S. airstrike but is still seen as the Islamic State group's founder.

Trump's accusation — and his use of the president's middle name, Hussein — echoed previous instances where he's questioned Obama's loyalties.

In June, when a shooter who claimed allegiance to ISIS killed 49 people in an Orlando, Florida, nightclub, Trump seemed to suggest Obama was sympathetic to the group when he said Obama "doesn't get it, or he gets it better than anybody understands." In the past, Trump has also falsely suggested Obama is a Muslim or was born in Kenya, where Obama's father was from.

The president, a Christian, was born in Hawaii.

Trump lobbed the allegation midway through his rally at a sports arena, where riled-up supporters shouted obscenities about Clinton and joined in unison to shout "lock her up." He railed against the fact that the Orlando shooter's father, Seddique Mateen, was spotted in the crowd behind Clinton during a Monday rally in Florida, adding, "Of course he likes Hillary Clinton."

Sitting behind Trump at his rally on Wednesday was former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla., who resigned in 2006 after allegations he sent sexually suggestive messages to former House pages.

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Associated Press writer Jill Colvin contributed to this report.

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