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3. When did Congress first recognize that part of its job is to investigate the executive branch?

On Nov. 4, 1791, Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair headed out with 1,400 troops to do battle with a heavily outnumbered force of Indians of the Western Confederacy in Ohio territory. He lost, badly. Congress wanted to know why, but there was no precedent for Congress to demand an accounting from the executive branch. The matter went all the way to President Washington, who ordered his department heads to turn over the records the congressional committee wanted. Congress concluded that the army had been ill-equipped, poorly trained, and miserably managed.

On Nov. 4, 1791, Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair headed out with 1,400 troops to do battle with a heavily outnumbered force of Indians of the Western Confederacy in Ohio territory. He lost, badly. Congress wanted to know why, but there was no precedent for Congress to demand an accounting from the executive branch. The matter went all the way to President Washington, who ordered his department heads to turn over the records the congressional committee wanted. Congress concluded that the army had been ill-equipped, poorly trained, and miserably managed.

On Nov. 4, 1791, Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair headed out with 1,400 troops to do battle with a heavily outnumbered force of Indians of the Western Confederacy in Ohio territory. He lost, badly. Congress wanted to know why, but there was no precedent for Congress to demand an accounting from the executive branch. The matter went all the way to President Washington, who ordered his department heads to turn over the records the congressional committee wanted. Congress concluded that the army had been ill-equipped, poorly trained, and miserably managed.

On Nov. 4, 1791, Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair headed out with 1,400 troops to do battle with a heavily outnumbered force of Indians of the Western Confederacy in Ohio territory. He lost, badly. Congress wanted to know why, but there was no precedent for Congress to demand an accounting from the executive branch. The matter went all the way to President Washington, who ordered his department heads to turn over the records the congressional committee wanted. Congress concluded that the army had been ill-equipped, poorly trained, and miserably managed.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP/File
(Read caption)

Watergate scandal of 1973

 

Teapot Dome scandal of 1922

 

Stock market crash of 1929

 

St. Clair Expedition of 1791

 
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