Subscribe

Northern California wildfire expands into Tahoe National Forest

The 128-square-mile wildfire in Northern California has consumed 32 structures have been burned; 21,000 buildings remain threatened.

Nearly three-dozen structures were destroyed in a massive Northern California wildfire that continues to spread more than a week after it started, officials said Sunday.

According to preliminary figures, 10 residences and 22 outbuildings were lost in the King Fire as the structures were discovered in the White Meadows area of Pollock Pines, said Capt. Tom Piranio (pih-RAH'-nee-oh), a state fire spokesman.

Assessment teams were headed back in the rugged, steep terrain to survey more damage, he said.

"It has been very challenging to get access to those burn areas because there's a lot of inaccessible terrain," Piranio said. "We had to make sure it was safe enough to enter."

Smoky conditions from the fire also forced a last-minute cancellation of two popular Ironman events in nearby Lake Tahoe Sunday morning, Ironman operations manager Keats McGonigal said. About 3,000 athletes from around the world were expected to participate, but couldn't due to poor air quality as the fire spread to the Tahoe National Forest northwest of Lake Tahoe over the weekend.

The fast-moving blaze located about 60 miles east of Sacramento that started Sept. 13 grew to more than 128 square miles Saturday despite periods of rain overnight. A man charged with starting the fire, Wayne Allen Huntsman, 37, pleaded not guilty to arson Friday and remains in the El Dorado County jail on $10 million bail.

More than 21,000 structures remain threatened as the blaze remains at 10 percent contained. More than 5,000 firefighters – from as far as Florida and Alaska – are helping California crews battle the blaze that has not only consumed grass and brush, but swaths of extremely dry tall timber.

Timber that could topple as crews try to construct more contingency and control lines while attacking the blaze from multiple spots, state fire Battalion Chief Scott McLean said Sunday.

"We need to get in there and make sure that all of our hot spots and those hazardous trees are taken care of and don't across our lines," McLean said. "We cannot become complacent. We have to continue to work as hard as possible to get this under control."

About 100 evacuees have been allowed to return home, but some 2,700 remain under evacuation orders, state fire spokesman Daniel Berlant said. The fire also continues to threaten a key University of California, Berkeley research station that is home to scores of experiments on trees, plants and other wildlife.

The dry conditions that have gripped California for the past three years have provided kindling for a possible record breaking fire season. 

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK