Rick Perry says campaign funds to cover future legal bills, talks foreign policy in Washington (+video)

The governor isn't seeking re-election, but may run again for president in 2016. As of June 30, he had $4 million-plus in campaign funds.

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Speaking to conservatives in Washington, Texas Governor Rick Perry said he's confident in his case as he faces two felony indictments on coercion and official oppression charges.

Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry says any future legal bills he incurs fighting two felony indictments will be paid for with campaign funds, not taxpayer dollars.

Perry has spent $80,000 in public funds on the case so far, and has retained a high-powered team of attorneys moving forward.

But spokeswoman Lucy Nashed said Thursday that further legal bills would come out of campaign coffers. She says she didn't know if there are plans to reimburse the state for Perry's past legal expenses.

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The governor isn't seeking re-election, but may run again for president in 2016. As of June 30, he had $4 million-plus in campaign funds.

Perry was indicted last week by a grand jury in Austin on coercion and official oppression. He calls the case a political ploy.

At a gathering at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington Perry signaled Thursday that he would be open to sending US combat forces to Iraq to fight the deadly Islamic state after its attacks on a Christian minority and the beheading of an American journalist.

"We need to have all of our options open," Perry told a gathering at the conservative Heritage Foundation.

The potential 2016 presidential candidate also raised the prospect of members of the Islamic state crossing the U.S. -Mexico border, which he said is too porous because of inaction by President Barack Obama.

Perry arrived in Washington shrugging off a pair of indictments, saying he was "confident" in his defense.

Perry was indicted last week by a grand jury in Austin on charges stemming from his veto last summer of state funds for public corruption prosecutors. He pleaded not guilty on Tuesday shortly after he was fingerprinted and had his mug shot taken.

He cited Democratic pundits who have said the charges are politically motivated.

Perry next heads to politically important New Hampshire.

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