Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Ryan Braun accepts 65-game MLB suspension. Who's next?

Ryan Braun, the 2011 National League MVP, was suspended for the rest of the season. Ryan Braun was cited for unspecified "violations" of both baseball's drug program and labor contract. Who's next?

(Page 2 of 3)



A person familiar with the deal, speaking on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized, said 50 games of the penalty were connected to Biogenesis. The additional 15 games stemmed from Braun's actions during the grievance that overturned his positive test from October 2011. The suspension will count as a first violation of the drug program, the person said.

Skip to next paragraph

"I'm shocked, but people make mistakes every day," Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia said. "He'll serve his time but, hopefully, he'll be able to continue his career."

Union head Michael Weiner said last week that arbitration hearings for players contesting suspensions likely would not start until September, which would delay any penalty until next season. But he also indicated the union would urge players to make a deal and get a suspension over with if there was strong evidence of guilt.

"I am deeply gratified to see Ryan taking this bold step," Weiner said in a statement. "It vindicates the rights of all players under the joint drug program. It is good for the game that Ryan will return soon to continue his great work both on and off the field."

Braun's acceptance of the suspension marks a 180-degree turnaround from his defiant spring training news conference in Phoenix last year, after his 50-game ban was overturned.

"We won," he said then, "because the truth is on my side. The truth is always relevant, and at the end of the day, the truth prevailed."

The 29-year-old Braun was hitting .298 with nine homers and 38 RBIs this year, slowed by a thumb injury that limited him to one game between June 9 and Friday. He was at Miller Park before Monday's game against San Diego and addressed the Brewers, then left without speaking to reporters.

"He apologized," pitcher John Axford said. "Whatever else was said beyond that, I don't think we need to carry outside of the clubhouse."

Braun met with MLB investigators in late June. Baseball's probe was boosted when Bosch, who ran Biogenesis, agreed last month to cooperate with the sport's investigators.

The suspension is the latest in a string of high-profile drug cases across sports. Cyclist Lance Armstrong, a seven-time Tour de France winner, ended years of denials in January, admitting he doped to win. Positive tests were disclosed this month involving sprinters Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson.

By serving the entire penalty this year, Braun gains a slight monetary advantage. His salary increases to $10 million next year, when a 65-game suspension would cost him about $500,000 more.

"We commend Ryan Braun for taking responsibility for his past actions," Rob Manfred, MLB's executive vice president for economics and league affairs, said in a statement. "We all agree that it is in the best interests of the game to resolve this matter. When Ryan returns, we look forward to him making positive contributions to Major League Baseball, both on and off the field."

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer