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James Holmes plea expected in Colorado theater shooting case

James Holmes is accused of killing 12 people and wounding another 70 in a suburban Denver movie theater last summer. He is expected to enter a plea on Tuesday.

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"You heard the evidence they have. There is no doubt that he knew what he was doing was wrong, there's no doubt it was premeditated," said Tom Teves of Phoenix, whose 24-year-old son, Alex, died in the theater while shielding his girlfriend. "There's no doubt he did it. Zero. So why are we playing a lot of games?"

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Holmes could also plead innocent — not by reason of insanity — which would significantly change the court fight. Prosecutors would not have those medical records, but Holmes could be convicted outright, with a possible life term or death.

No matter how Holmes pleads, he could still be convicted and sentenced to execution or life in prison without parole. Prosecutors have 60 days after the plea to say whether they will seek the death penalty.

The hard-fought case has already taken some surprise turns, and Tuesday's hearing could offer another unforeseen twist, including the remote possibility the two sides, ordered by the judge to not speak publicly about the case, have reached a plea agreement.

The case could also veer in other directions:

— Holmes could be ordered to undergo an evaluation to determine whether he is mentally competent to stand trial — able to understand what is going on in court and to help his lawyers. If he is found incompetent, the case would come to a halt and he would undergo treatment at the state mental hospital indefinitely, until doctors there say his competency has been restored.

— Holmes could plead guilty, but that appeared unlikely, given his attorneys' vigorous defense, unless prosecutors offered a plea deal sparing him the death penalty or offering another concession.

— Some unforeseen issue raised by attorneys could delay the case, or Holmes could be absent, as he was at a November court date that corresponds roughly with the time he was taken to Denver Health Medical Center's psychiatric ward.

Since his arrest outside the theater, his attorneys have aggressively challenged prosecutors, investigators and even the constitutionality of Colorado law nearly every step of the way.

Just this month, they asked the presiding judge, William Sylvester, to rule parts of the state insanity law unconstitutional, arguing it raised too many questions for them to give Holmes effective advice. Sylvester refused.

"This is going to take some time. You know, I remind myself that they got the guy, he's not going anywhere," said Tom Sullivan, whose 27-year-old son, Alex, died on his birthday at the movie theater. "I don't know what kind of shape he's in right now, but you assume it's not a pleasant experience what's going on right now."

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