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Will Romney's claim he's for '100 percent' help him bounce back? (+video)

After a video leaked showing Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney saying 47 percent of Americans are dependent upon government, the candidate tried to recover Wednesday, saying his campaign was about helping '100 percent' of Americans.

By Steve HollandReuters / September 19, 2012

US Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney greets supporters at a campaign rally in Miami.

Jim Young/Reuters

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Miami

Seeking to recover from his disparaging remarks about the half of the country that gets government benefits, Republican Mitt Romney said on Wednesday his presidential campaign was about helping the "100 percent" in America.

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In a fundraising speech in Atlanta and a television interview in Miami, Romney said he would do a better job of helping the poor than President Barack Obama. Advisers said Romney would step up the pace of his campaigning as the tight presidential contest enters its final seven weeks.

"My campaign is about the 100 percent in America and I'm concerned about them," Romney said in an interview with the Spanish-language Univision network in Miami as he sought to control the damage from what appeared to be the worst two days of his campaign.

"I'm concerned about the fact that over the past four years life has become harder for Americans. More people have fallen into poverty, more people we just learned have had to go onto food stamps," he added.

Romney wants the Nov. 6 election to be a referendum on Obama's handling of the weak U.S. economy, but self-inflicted wounds have sidetracked him this week. A secretly recorded video that surfaced on Monday suggested he was writing off Obama supporters as people dependent on government with no sense of personal responsibility.

Some 43 percent of registered voters thought less of Romney after seeing the video, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll, while a mostly Republican 26 percent viewed him more favorably. Independent voters were more likely to say the video lowered their opinion of Romney.

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