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New generation of vets find camaraderie, services online

Web-savvy veterans are using the internet more frequently to connect with one another, and traditional veterans programs are following suit. The Department of Veterans Affairs and the VFW are reaching out to vets in unconventional ways.

By Dan ElliottAssociated Press / September 16, 2012

Brenda Smull, public affairs officer for VFW Post 1 and post commander Izzy Abbass, pose for their photo on the steps of the facility in Denver on June 5. The VFW's oldest chapter, Post 1, in Denver, is reorganizing itself around the needs of the new veterans. Its new building is currently being remodeled and won't have a full-time bar.

Ed Andrieski/AP

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Denver

Busy, tech-savvy and often miles from their peers, thousands of new veterans are going online to find camaraderie or get their questions answered — forcing big changes in long-established veterans groups and inspiring entrepreneurs to launch new ones.

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"We're going back to school, we have full-time jobs, we have families and kids," said Marco Bongioanni, 33, of New York, who deployed to Iraq twice while on active duty in the Army.

That leaves little time for what he calls "brick-and-mortar" groups like the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion.

Bongioanni and many other men and women who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are gravitating to websites open only to them, where they can talk about GI Bill education benefits, job hunting, the personal toll of war and other concerns they share, any time, day or night.

"The fact that it's a virtual world, 24/7, allows us to manage it better," said Bongioanni, now a major in the Army Reserve and attending Army Command and General Staff College in Georgia.

They can also track their health benefits on a Department of Veterans Affairs website and read the VFW magazine on their smartphones, upgrades prompted at least in part by the needs and habits of the 1.4 million veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"You need to go where they are, and that's online," said Jerry Newberry, director of communications for the VFW.

Not all the changes are happening online. The VFW's oldest chapter, Post 1 in Denver, was created in 1899 by First Colorado Volunteers returning from the Philippines in the Spanish-American War. Today, it's reorganizing around the needs of the new veterans.

Its new building, currently being remodeled, won't have a full-time bar. The space will be devoted instead to offices for veterans service groups, said Izzy Abbass, the post commander and a 44-year-old Army veteran of the first Gulf War.

"We're not the traditional VFW post," he said. "Typically the image is of a smoky, dark bar, (a) bunch of guys wearing funny hats sitting around bitching, and they look a lot older than I do."

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