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Space pioneer John Glenn honored 50 years after historic flight

Hundreds of NASA workers jammed a space center auditorium to mark the 50th anniversary of John Glenn's historic flight, to see and hear the first American to circle the Earth.

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"That wasn't a very good confidence-builder for our first trip to the cape," Glenn said.

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Improvements were made, and Glenn said he gained confidence in his Mercury-Atlas rocket, a converted nuclear missile. Otherwise, he said he would not have climbed aboard.

Glenn and his wife Annie were on hand Thursday evening for the attempted liftoff of the newest of the Atlas rockets, an unmanned booster that NASA contractors hope one day will carry astronauts. Windy weather forced a scrub of the Navy satellite launch.

"Scrub! Welcome to the space program," Glenn said at the news conference held in the old Mercury Mission Control, now located at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. "Not anything brand new to me." Lousy weather spoiled Friday night's launch attempt as well.

It took 11 tries for Glenn to get off the pad in 1962. He boarded three times before finally taking off, which he believes created even more of a public frenzy over his flight.

On Saturday, Glenn and Carpenter will reunite with more than 100 retirees who worked on Project Mercury. And on Monday, the actual anniversary, Glenn will be feted at Ohio State University; its school of public affairs bears his name.

Glenn said he's uncertain how he'll mark the exact time of liftoff – 9:47 a.m. – come Monday. He admitted sometimes forgetting to mark the precise moment in the past. But not for this golden one, "for sure."

Besides reminiscing Friday, Glenn and Carpenter spoke of the future of space travel. When asked by Cabana "given where we've come, where are we going," Carpenter had a one-word response. "Mars." The crowd applauded.

Glenn had more to offer, stressing the importance of exploration as well as scientific research. He criticized the previous administration for promoting lunar bases and Mars travel, but providing no funds, and for canceling the space shuttle program. "A big mistake," he said.

Glenn noted how NASA is relying on the Russians to transport American astronauts to and from the International Space Station, now that the shuttles are retired. That will continue until private U.S. companies have spacecraft ready to fly crews, an estimated five years away.

"What a big change that is from the days when there were the depths of the Cold War … fueling a lot of the interest in the space program," he said.

Carpenter said he deplores the fact that America seems to have lost its resolve to press ahead in space exploration, as evidenced by NASA's small share of the federal budget.

"I really miss my citizenship that was once in a can-do nation," he said.

Another change in five decades: Glenn pointed out how cellphones have "more computing capacity than anything back at the time when we were flying in '62." Society has become so accustomed to new things, he said, that it will be difficult for NASA to generate the kind of excitement that Project Mercury or Apollo's moonwalks did.

Repeatedly Friday, Glenn and Carpenter paid tribute to their five deceased Mercury colleagues: Shepard, Grissom, Wally SchirraGordon Cooper and Deke Slayton.

"We need five more chairs here," Glenn told the NASA crowd.

The two pioneers received standing ovations.

Milestones in U.S. manned spaceflight

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