All Justice

  • Abdulmutallab charged in Christmas Day terror attempt

    The six-count grand jury indictment against Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, the alleged bomber in the failed Christmas Day terror attempt, carries the possibility of life in prison.

  • Court sets new rules for legal challenges at Guantánamo

    A federal appeals court in Washington ruled against a cook who worked for an Al Qaeda-linked group and was challenging the legality of his detention. The ruling clarified the ground rules for future habeas corpus cases brought by Guantánamo detainees.

  • Las Vegas shooting: rage against the courts

    Las Vegas shooting: rage against the courts

    Las Vegas shooting suspect Johnny Lee Wicks had a long rap sheet and was reportedly upset about the dismissal of his lawsuit against the Social Security Administration. Experts say it's not easy to tell whether a disgruntled plaintiff will become a violent one.

  • Supreme Court drops key case on limits of immunity for prosecutors

    Prosecutors alleged to have framed two innocent men for a murder agreed on a $12 million settlement Monday. A Supreme Court ruling could have clarified the limits of immunity for prosecutors – a legal issue that had even the Obama administration commenting on the case.

  • Las Vegas courthouse shooting highlights rising threat

    Las Vegas courthouse shooting highlights rising threat

    A gunman opened fire at a Las Vegas federal courthouse Monday, injuring a US marshal and killing a security officer. Threats to federal judges and prosecutors have more than doubled since 2003, according to a recent Justice Department report.

  • Court says US can stay mum about Guantánamo surveillance

    Court says US can stay mum about Guantánamo surveillance

    Lawyers for Guantánamo detainees want surveillance records. An appeals court ruled Wednesday that agencies could refuse to confirm or deny the existence of such records for national security.

  • Federal court in California limits police use of Tasers

    Federal court in California limits police use of Tasers

    The appeals court ruling could raise the bar for when the electric stun-guns can be deployed. Local police departments said the ruling puts officers' lives in danger.

  • No right to bear unlicensed machine guns, federal court says

    No right to bear unlicensed machine guns, federal court says

    Tennessee State Guard commander Richard Hamblen said it's his Second Amendment right as part of a militia to convert assault rifles into fully automatic weapons. The Sixth US Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed.

  • Echoes of 2001 shoe bomber in Detroit attack

    In both cases, passengers and crew subdued the alleged bomber before the explosive material could fully ignite. In the Detroit attack, passengers heard popping noises and saw suspect Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab's pants on fire when they intervened, according to court documents.

  • Both balloon boy parents sentenced to jail time for hoax

    Both balloon boy parents sentenced to jail time for hoax

    Richard Heene will serve 90 days in jail, the maximum proposed under a plea deal reached earlier for his role in the hoax. Mayumi Heene will serve 20 days. 'Balloon boy' parents' sentence also bars them from profiting from the incident.

  • Runaway convert case: family issue or test of sharia law in US?

    Runaway convert case: family issue or test of sharia law in US?

    A Muslim girl who converted to Christianity in Ohio fled her family because she said she felt her life was in danger. A judge ruled Tuesday that the family must discuss their religious views, though they are not required to meet in person.

  • Skeptics dominate hearing on Guantanamo detainees in Illinois

    Skeptics dominate hearing on Guantanamo detainees in Illinois

    Federal and state officials faced hard questions and some jeers at a public hearing on the proposed transfer of Guantanamo detainees to a prison in northwest Illinois.

  • As deadline approaches, Obama speeds up Guantánamo Bay closure

    As deadline approaches, Obama speeds up Guantánamo Bay closure

    The Obama administration's announcement Sunday that 12 Guantánamo detainees would be sent to other countries followed news that some detainees would be transferred to an Illinois facility. The president set a Jan. 22, 2010 deadline for closing the Guantánamo Bay prison, but seems unlikely to meet it.

  • Lockerbie bombing families find 21-year anniversary a tough one

    Lockerbie bombing families find 21-year anniversary a tough one

    Families of Lockerbie bombing victims gather in Washington, knowing that the only man convicted of the crime has been released from prison for health reasons and had almost £2 million in a bank account at the time Pan Am Flight 103 went down.

  • Judge delays Oklahoma plan to post abortion details online

    An Oklahoma law would require women having an abortion to fill out an anonymous questionnaire, the results of which would be made public. A legal challenge to the law will be decided Feb. 19, a judge said Friday.

  • Wisconsin lawsuit tests a pioneering campaign finance law

    Wisconsin Right to Life is challenging a law that provides public money to candidates for the state supreme court. The group says the campaign finance law will create a chilling effect on political speech.

  • Why is use of the death penalty going down?

    Why is use of the death penalty going down?

    Fewer people received a death sentence over the past 12 months than in any year since 1976, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. One reason: Some state prosecutors are growing more hesitant to seek a death sentence in cases that might later be upended because of DNA evidence.

  • Guantanamo detainees on US soil: a legal minefield

    Guantanamo detainees on US soil: a legal minefield

    President Obama wants to house some Guantanamo detainees in an Illinois prison. But bringing the detainess to the US will likely broaden their legal rights. 'How much?' is the unanswered question.

  • Illinois divided over news of incoming Guantanamo detainees

    Illinois divided over news of incoming Guantanamo detainees

    Illinois' Republican lawmakers oppose the Obama administration's decision to transfer some Guantanamo detainees to a prison in the state - and a recent poll shows a majority of Illinois voters do, too. But Democratic leaders are behind the move, citing new jobs.

  • Supreme Court refuses case on Guantanamo detainees and torture

    The case of four Britons, held two years by the US, sought to clarify legal protections for Guantanamo detainees, including regarding torture and harsh government tactics. Supreme Court justices on Monday declined to hear the case.