Subscribe
 

More in

PoliticsPolitics

 

Are you a true Ron Paul supporter? Take our quiz!

Quiz results are tabulated by assigning a score to each answer and then adding the scores up. Your final score determines which of our five categories you fall into. Disagree with the results? Try again.

Your results

You are probably a communist.

With your authoritarian socialist views, you are pretty much the exact opposite of a Ron Paul supporter. You should consider moving to Cuba.

You really like the idea of government.

You might share some of Paul's views on civil liberties and a non-interventionist foreign policy, but, when it comes right down to it, you find the idea of big government really comforting.

You are a potential Paulite.

You probably don't despise the Fed with the same passion as Paul, and some of his views about the gold standard, legalized prostitution, and civil rights leave you cold. But you don't think that Paul is the wacko that many of his detractors make him out to be.

Ron is your man.

Of all our country's major political figures, left, right, and center, Ron Paul best represents your views.

You are an anarcho-capitalist.

You have sailed right past Paul's hard-nosed libertarianism and off into the uncharted waters of right-wing anarchism. You would be most happy living on a private island that you have declared a sovereign state, which, needless to say, won't be seeking to join the UN anytime soon..

Share your results

Your responses

Question Your Response
What board game best represents your vision of a just society?

Twister. It refutes radical individualism by demonstrating how readily people's interests can become entangled. (1)

Monopoly. The banker has no inherent advantage, there's a luxury tax, and rich people sometimes go to jail. (2)

Risk. It's important to remain active in international affairs in order to remain relevant on the global stage. For instance, you have to conquer Brazil before you can invade Africa. (3)

The Game of Life. You succeed or fail based on the choices you make, and the person with the most money at the end wins. (4)

Hungry Hungry Hippos. When each individual hippo seeks to maximize its self-interest, the marbles are consumed in the most efficient possible manner. (5)

What Beatles song best captures your political philosophy?

"You Never Give Me Your Money." Because I want people to give me money. (1)

"Revolution." I support social change, but sometimes people can go too far. (2)

"Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da." Desmond is not bound by traditional gender roles, yet he remains happy in the marketplace. (3)

"Taxman." George called it like it is. Taxation is theft. (4)

"Octopus Garden." No one there to tell us what to do. (5)

Now that "Atlas Shrugged" has been made into a film, what should be the next political book to be adapted to the big screen?

Al Franken's "Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them," starring Chevy Chase as Bill O'Reilly. (1)

Hunter S. Thompson's "Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72," starring Alan Alda as George McGovern. (2)

Carl Sandberg's "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years," starring Will Ferrell as Lincoln. (3)

Ludwig von Mises's "Human Action: A Treatise on Economics," starring John Stossel as the principle of praxeology. (4)

Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson's "The Illuminatus! Trilogy," starring Penn Jillette as Hagbard Celine. (5)

Who was the greatest US president?

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, for defeating tyranny abroad and for providing relief to millions of workers at home. (1)

Abraham Lincoln, for preserving the Union, ending slavery, and modernizing the economy. (2)

Ronald Reagan, for his strengthening of the military and his expansion of economic freedoms. (3)

Thomas Jefferson, for his ideal of a nation of independent landowners under a strictly limited government. (4)

William Henry Harrison, because he did absolutely nothing while in office, setting a positive example for future administrations. (5)

If you could be any animal, what would it be?

A lamprey. I want to simply attach myself to another organism and let it do all the work. (1)

An army ant. I like to feel like I'm part of something larger than myself. (2)

A search-and-rescue dog. I want to make a positive difference in the world, but I'd also like to be a dog. (3)

A bald eagle. I like the idea of soaring through the sky, completely free. (4)

Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, a type of bacteria that doesn't rely on any other organisms, living or dead, or even sunlight, to survive. It is generally found living in gold mines. (Yes, it's not technically an animal, but taxonomy is just a theory.) (5)

Your daughter announces to you that she's getting married. You say:

No way. Families exist only to provide laborers for the bourgeoise. (I just wish I had thought of that before I helped bring you into the world.) (1)

I'll call a justice of the peace and set up the date. Let's not bother with a church wedding. (2)

It had better be to a man. The Constitution should define marriage as between a single man and a single woman. (3)

Let's do it in a church. Don't bother with the marriage license. (4)

Whatever. Just don't develop any altruistic feelings for your spouse, as doing so will interfere with the imperative to act in accordance with the hierarchy of your values. (5)

What place and time in world history saw the most fair and just economic conditions?

Contemporary Sweden, whose mixed system of high-tech capitalism and extensive welfare benefits allow for economic mobility while still providing a robust social safety net. (1)

The United States during the post-World War II economic boom, which was brought about by strong unions, high marginal taxes, and a well-educated work force financed by the GI bill. (2)

Silicon Valley during the late 1990s, when entrepreneurs could become instant millionaires by building the backbone of the World Wide Web, or simply by adding an "e-" prefix to the name of a business. (3)

The United States during the 1870s and 1880s, when the government's hard money policies led to rapid industrialization and an increase in prosperity. (4)

Deadwood, Dakota Territory, during the 1870s, when the gold practically leapt from the ground into the pans of enterprising prospectors, who didn't owe a cent to the taxman because there was no government. (5)

Your idea of a fun day includes:

Spray-painting anti-corporate slogans on highway overpasses. (1)

Taking mass transit to a museum that has been funded with a National Endowment for the Arts grant, followed by a stroll through a public park. (2)

Hitting the mall for a shopping spree. (3)

Arguing about the capital gains tax with Occupy protesters and then going to a shooting range. (4)

Going to a supermarket in a low-income neighborhood, spotting mothers with WIC EBT cards, and smacking them on the head with a copy of Hayek's "Road to Serfdom." (5)

If you could be any superhero, who would you be?

Captain Planet. He has vaguely defined powers that always effectively stop polluters, just like the EPA should have. (1)

Wonder Woman. She is an ambassador of international peace between the Amazons and the outside world. (2)

Spider-Man. He has some amazing superpowers, but in the end he's still just a regular guy. (3)

Iron Man. He has the wealth and engineering skills of Batman, but not as much emotional baggage. (4)

Rorschach. He views the world in stark black and white terms, and yet people project onto him whatever they want to see. (5)

What is your favorite holiday?

International Workers Day. I like marching down the street with a red and/or black flag shouting anti-capitalist slogans. (1)

Earth Day. It's important to remember to protect the natural environment, even if just for one day a year. (2)

Thanksgiving. I like spending time with my family. I also like eating. (3)

July 4. I like celebrating the freedoms that have made America great. (4)

None. The government does not have the authority to declare holidays. (5)

If you had a sudden windfall of a million dollars, how would you spend it?

I would donate it to the federal departments of Energy, Housing and Urban Development, Commerce, Interior, and Education. (1)

I would donate a big chunk of it to charity, and spend the rest on myself and my family. (2)

I would use it to start my own business. (3)

I would donate it to Ron Paul's Super PAC. (4)

I would use it to buy gold bullion, and then spend my days arguing with retailers who refuse to accept it as legal tender. (5)

A local blogger writes something that you disagree with. What do you do?

Call the FBI and say that you think the blogger has links to Al Qaeda, in the hopes that the blog will be shut down and its creator hauled off to Guantanamo. (1)

Attempt to file a civil complaint against the blogger using your state's or city's blue laws. (2)

Do nothing. It's a free country, and people can write what they like. (3)

Send a polite email to the blogger pointing out where your opinions differ. (4)

Round up as many passionate like-minded people you can, and then attempt to overwhelm the blog with angry comments. (5)

What is the greatest threat to America's security?

Private ownership of the means of production. A revolutionary vanguard should expropriate the expropriators. (1)

Global warming. We should institute a carbon tax or a robust cap-and-trade system to curb rising temperatures. (2)

Terrorism. Our government should aggressively pursue terrorists abroad and at home. (3)

The Federal Reserve. By creating money out of thin air and secretly meddling with the free market, the Fed is sending our country down the path to bankruptcy. (4)

The entire US government. With it's monopoly over the legislation and enforcement of federal laws, it continues to oppress us all. (5)

What three items do you never leave home without?

Communist Party membership card, beret, Molotov cocktail. (1)

Canvas shopping bag, reusable water bottle, solar charger. (2)

Keys, wallet or purse, cell phone. (3)

Top hat, monocle, cane. (4)

Copy of the constitution, a gun, bag of gold. (5)

You teenage son wants to color his hair bright red, in contravention of his public high school's dress code rules. What do you do?

All students should be required to have red hair, to symbolize the sacrifices made by proletarian revolutionaries around the globe. (1)

Rules are rules. If the school says you can't color your hair, you can't color your hair. (2)

I would ask him to hold off on his decision until we can challenge the dress code at the next school board meeting. (3)

The dress code rules are an infringement on my son's freedom of expression. Let him dye. (4)

I would never consider sending my kid to a public school where he can be brainwashed by the state. (5)

 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 
Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK