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20 million more people insured thanks to ACA, says Obama

For the first time, more than 9 in 10 Americans have health insurance. 

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    President Barack Obama talks with Finn Bode as his mother Courtney Bode takes photos at Engine Company No 3 in Milwaukee, Thursday, March 3, 2016. The president's trip to Milwaukee is to celebrate the city’s victory in the Healthy Communities Challenge, a competition between 20 cities to increase the number of Americans with health insurance during the latest Health Insurance Marketplace open enrollment period.
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President Barack Obama trumpeted the nation's declining uninsured rate Thursday and said 20 million people have gained insurance as a result of his signature health care law as he commemorated the approaching sixth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act.

Obama criticized Republicans for trying to "repeal or undermine" the act about 60 times and said they've explained what they would replace it with "about zero times."

"If they got their way, 20 million people will have their insurance taken away from them," Obama said.

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Congratulating local leaders in Wisconsin for winning a national health insurance enrollment contest, Obama acknowledged that millions more are eligible to enroll but have yet to do so. He attributed some of that to acrimony over the law, saying people haven't always known what's true and what's not.

Obama was introduced at the event by Brent Brown of Mosinee, Wisconsin, who said he's a Republican who never voted to elect Obama and worked to ensure he would not be president. But he said the health care law saved his life after he was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and ran out of money for treatment.

Brown called on Republicans to quit trying to repeal the law. "Swallow your pride as I am doing right now," he said.

More than 38,000 Milwaukee-area residents have newly signed up for health coverage, out of about 51,000 uninsured people who were eligible to enroll. The city's sign-up ratio was the highest among the 20 cities competing in the president's "Healthy Communities Challenge." The winning city was promised a visit by the president.

"All told, counting new folks and people renewing their coverage, you got nearly 90,000 people to sign up," Obama said. "That's enough to fill Lambeau Field and still have a big tailgating party with folks outside. And those tailgaters wouldn't have to worry because Obamacare covers indigestion from too many brats." Lambeau Field is the home of the NFL's Green Bay Packers.

Obama also faulted Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker for refusing federal funding to expand Medicaid, an option given to states under the law, to help cover more people. Obama said 21,000 additional state residents would be covered "with the stroke of his pen."

"He's denying Wisconsinites their ticket to health insurance and it's political," Obama said of Walker, who dropped out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination last year. Walker has argued that the federal government can't be trusted to keep its funding commitment to the states.

Walker spokeswoman Laurel Patrick said Thursday that due to Walker's entitlement reforms, everyone in poverty is covered through Medicaid, without exposing taxpayers to potential liability. She added that the Kaiser Family Foundation says Wisconsin is the only state that didn't expand Medicaid without a gap in coverage.

"Because of our unique reforms everyone in the state of Wisconsin has access to coverage," she said.

For the first time, more than 9 in 10 Americans have health insurance. And the number of uninsured has dropped from about 44.8 million in 2013, the year before the health care law's big coverage expansion, to about 28.8 million, according to the latest estimates.

An improving economy has also helped boost coverage, analysts say.

Still, polling continues to show that slightly more Americans view the law unfavorably than favorably. And repealing the law has been a mantra of Republicans running for federal office as critics argue that the law's mandates have increased coverage costs unnecessarily.

Obama is using his final year to visit communities he says have benefited from his presidency. He hailed the auto industry's rebound during a recent trip to Detroit and last week touted the economic stimulus bill on a visit to Florida. Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law on March 23, 2010.

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