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A Mitt Romney-Rick Santorum ticket? Don’t rule it out.

As Republicans in Alabama and Mississippi go to the polls, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum are hurling insults at each other. But they could still be on the GOP ticket together.

By Staff writer / March 13, 2012

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum visits with supporters following a rally Monday in Montgomery, Ala.

Eric Gay/AP

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Washington

It’s Southern Super Tuesday, and Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney have been dishing up the insults fast and furious ahead of crucial primaries in Mississippi and Alabama.

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On Tuesday, Mr. Santorum went after Mr. Romney’s record as a venture capitalist – a line of attack that he had avoided before.

“Governor Romney has a career as an investment banker and someone who's a private equity guy on Wall Street. I'm not too sure that necessarily commends you well to be president of the United States,” Santorum said on the nationally syndicated show “Kilmeade & Friends,” according to MSNBC.

On Monday, Santorum suggested that Romney is a “socialist,” because “Romneycare” was “a government takeover of one-sixth of the economy.” Santorum was reacting to Romney’s assertion on Fox Business Network earlier in the day that Santorum isn’t conservative enough on fiscal matters.  

Romney had been asked whether he would choose a running mate who is more conservative than he, if he wins the nomination.

"Well, that would preclude Rick Santorum," Romney said. "I find it interesting that he continues to describe himself as the real conservative. Rick Santorum is not a person who is an economic conservative to my right. His record does not suggest he has the fiscal conservative chops that I have."

Santorum reacted with incredulity.

“I’m too liberal?” Santorum said Monday night in an interview with ABC News. “This is the imaginary world of Mitt Romney’s ideology. It’s just sad.”

Romney and his surrogates have repeatedly attacked Santorum for aggressively pursuing earmarks for his home state of Pennsylvania when he was a senator, and for voting for colleagues’ pet projects, such as Alaska’s infamous “bridge to nowhere.”

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