All USA

  • 'Project Censored' lists top stories that go unreported

    'Project Censored' lists top stories that go unreported

    "Project Censored" criticizes print and broadcast media outlets for overlooking important issues in favor of "junk food news." The group blames political, economic, and legal pressure.

  • Baby boomers: Officially, you’re now senior citizens

    Baby boomers: Officially, you’re now senior citizens

    Baby boomers – those born 1946-1964 – represent the largest population growth in US history. What will they do in retirement, and what impact will that have on society and the economy?

  • Rose Bowl: Do you remember its famous football blooper?

    Rose Bowl: Do you remember its famous football blooper?

    Saturday’s Rose Bowl game, the 97th in its long history, boasts the only undefeated team, Texas Christian, that didn’t make it into this year’s Bowl Championship Series title game (Auburn versus Oregon on Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz.). Third-ranked, 12-0 TCU, the Mountain West Conference champ, will make its first-ever appearance in Pasadena against 11-1 Wisconsin of the Big Ten. The Badgers are fourth-ranked in most polls. TCU's Horned Frogs haven’t played a more important game since 1939, when as the nation’s No. 1 team they defeated Carnegie Tech, 15-7, in the Sugar Bowl. This marks Wisconsin’s seventh trip to the Rose Bowl, but its first since 2000. In a statistical oddity, TCU and Wisconsin have both averaged 43.3 points per game, fourth best in the country. Coverage begins at 5:00 p.m. ET on ESPN. To prep for the game, try your hand at this 20-question Rose Bowl quiz.

  • Oprah Winfrey channel debuts Saturday, but is it time for a new network?

    Oprah Winfrey channel debuts Saturday, but is it time for a new network?

    Oprah Winfrey, whose successful syndicated show is in its last season, is launching her new cable TV network OWN to start the new year. The move is a risky one, media analysts say.

  • 'Snooki' Polizzi? Nope. Try these 10 weirdest New Year's Eve celebrations.

    'Snooki' Polizzi? Nope. Try these 10 weirdest New Year's Eve celebrations.

    'Snooki' Polizzi or a big Times Square ball? Please. How about a fish, a rodent, or an enormous roll of lunch meat? When these cities party on New Year's Eve, they get creative.

  • Health care reform 101: What will kick in Jan. 1?

    Health care reform 101: What will kick in Jan. 1?

    Some parts of health care reform are already phasing in. Here nine key provisions that take effect Jan. 1.

  • How Petraeus has changed the Afghanistan war

    How Petraeus has changed the Afghanistan war

    Gen. David Petraeus replaced Gen. Stanley McChrystal as head of US forces in the Afghanistan war this year. One change he's made represents something of a gamble to some in the Pentagon.

  • Education reform: eight school chiefs to watch in 2011

    Education reform: eight school chiefs to watch in 2011

    Education reform will be on many state education agendas across the nation in 2011. The past year saw Republicans elected or appointed to top state education posts in many states. But a bipartisan group of veteran education leaders has also stepped up to call for more dramatic change in how schools operate. Here’s a sampling of state education leaders to watch:

  • New year's mission at NASA: repair new cracks on Discovery fuel tank

    New year's mission at NASA: repair new cracks on Discovery fuel tank

    After months of repairs, inspections, and more repairs, NASA technicians have a new crop of cracks on the fuel tank of the shuttle Discovery to keep them busy over New Year's weekend.

  • Will Obama’s lame-duck dealmaking survive in the new year?

    Will Obama’s lame-duck dealmaking survive in the new year?

    Even with the deep partisan divide, Obama and Congress worked together in the lame-duck session. But pressure on the president from the left and right will grow in the new year.

  • Billy the Kid: why he missed out on a pardon once again

    Billy the Kid: why he missed out on a pardon once again

    Billy the Kid killed two guards during an escape after he was first denied a pardon 130 years ago, Gov. Bill Richardson said, a leading factor in his decision not to pardon Billy the Kid Friday.

  • Ethnic studies classes illegal in Arizona public schools as of Jan. 1

    Ethnic studies classes illegal in Arizona public schools as of Jan. 1

    Much of the controversial Arizona immigration law remains tied up in court, but a law banning ethnic studies in Arizona is set to take effect Saturday. A Tucson school district vows to fight it.

  • From marijuana to 'sexting': new laws set to take effect Jan. 1

    From marijuana to 'sexting': new laws set to take effect Jan. 1

    In all, 45 states, the District of Columbia, Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico passed 31,005 new laws in 2010. Some of them will come into effect with the new year. Here is a sampling of some of the trends in lawmaking in 2010.

  • NAACP: Sisters' release makes Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour 'shining example'

    NAACP: Sisters' release makes Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour 'shining example'

    Just last week, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour was in hot water over his apparent approval of the all-white Citizens Council in the 1960s. But Thursday the NAACP lauded him for suspending the life sentences of two black sisters.

  • Top five movie trends and surprises of 2010

    Top five movie trends and surprises of 2010

    Movies both disappointed and surprised studios and audiences in 2010. Star power dimmed while real-life stories turned both dramatic and documentary features into unexpected hits. And technology wowed, then disappointed as 3D and high-profile sequels fizzled at the box office. The top trends from this year present a very mixed bag heading into the second decade of the new millennium, says Hollywood.com box office analyst Paul Dergarabedian. IN PICTURES: Movie Trends 2010

  • Financial aid for college: tips for the new FAFSA form

    For students in need of financial aid, the new Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) becomes available online Saturday.

  • Christine O'Donnell: Why she's no Sarah Palin

    Christine O'Donnell: Why she's no Sarah Palin

    Christine O'Donnell, who faces allegations of improper use of campaign funds, seems to be cut from the same cloth as Sarah Palin. Where they may differ is the ability to withstand adversity.

  • An earthquake in Indiana? How does that happen?

    An earthquake in Indiana? How does that happen?

    The 3.8-magnitude earthquake in Indiana that rattled residents – OK, maybe some teacups – hit one of the seismically quietest parts of the country.

  • How will Pentagon handle 'don't ask, don't tell' repeal? Five questions answered.

    How will Pentagon handle 'don't ask, don't tell' repeal? Five questions answered.

    For the US military, there are a number of lingering questions about how to implement the legislation repealing 'don’t ask, don’t tell.' But a Pentagon supplement released in November offers clear answers on a number of matters relating to the repeal.

  • Afghanistan war: how a model province tumbled into violence

    Afghanistan war: how a model province tumbled into violence

    Khost Province had been a US success story in the Afghanistan war. But poor local leadership, an influx of insurgents fleeing US pressure elsewhere, and the proximity to Pakistan are stubborn challenges.