Subscribe

All USA

  • Newt Gingrich's rise – and fall – tied to his reign as House speaker

    After leading in some polls, New Gingrich has fallen out of favor with most Republican voters – especially in the key state of Iowa. He's taken a drubbing in negative ads, and much of the response from lawmakers who served with him in the House has been more criticism or silence.

  • Mitt Romney's 'electability' against Obama key to Iowa caucuses

    Mitt Romney's 'electability' against Obama key to Iowa caucuses

    Mitt Romney is mostly ignoring his GOP rivals, concentrating instead on challenging Barack Obama. It's part of his general election strategy, designed to show Republicans in Iowa and elsewhere that he'd be most 'electable' next November.

  • Despite Ron Paul surge, tea party hopes on the ropes in Iowa

    Despite Ron Paul surge, tea party hopes on the ropes in Iowa

    As tea party support splinters along more traditional political lines, polls show that hopes for nominating a conservative outsider who embodies constitutional ideals have withered. The question now is whether tea partiers will embrace a more conventional presidential nominee.

  • Why would anyone steal Banana Sam, beloved San Francisco monkey?

    A 17-year-old squirrel monkey named Banana Sam was stolen Friday morning from the San Fransciso Zoo. In the past, zoo thieves have tried to sell stolen zoo animals and even used them to impress girlfriends.

  • Feds chasing fast-moving Hollywood arsonists

    Feds chasing fast-moving Hollywood arsonists

    The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has joined California fire investigators searching for arsonists torching cars at the height of arson season: New Year's. More cars burned Saturday morning.

  • Antiabortion ads from outlier presidential candidate raise eyebrows

    Antiabortion ads from outlier presidential candidate raise eyebrows

    Antiabortion activist Randall Terry, running for president as a Democrat, is running graphic ads about abortion in early primary states. Free-speech rules allow federal candidates to run uncensored ads.

  • New Year’s Eve: five ways to ring in 2012

    New Year’s Eve: five ways to ring in 2012

    New Year’s Eve festivities are already under way in some parts of the world. Here’s a sampling of fun ways people can celebrate the dawn of 2012 – in the United States and beyond.

  • Which GOP rivals would vote for Ron Paul if he's GOP nominee?

    Which GOP rivals would vote for Ron Paul if he's GOP nominee?

    Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Mitt Romney are on the record about how they would vote. Other Republican candidates have sidestepped the matter, saying Ron Paul won't be the GOP nominee.

  • To win the future, heed this ginormous list of amazing (but overused) words

    To win the future, heed this ginormous list of amazing (but overused) words

    The headline above contains a generous sampling from this year's 'List of Words Banished from the Queen's English for Misuse, Overuse and General Uselessness.' Read on.

  • If Mitt Romney wins both Iowa and N.H., it may be 'game over'

    If Mitt Romney wins both Iowa and N.H., it may be 'game over'

    If Mitt Romney wins both Iowa and New Hampshire, it would be a first for someone who isn’t already president. But the Iowa caucuses have a habit of producing surprises, and there are scenarios under which Romney doesn't live up to expectations.

  • Court rules for telecoms' role in domestic eavesdropping

    A US appellate court has ruled that telecom companies have the right to legal immunity for helping the government eavesdrop on private communications. But in a separate opinion, the court also ruled that customers can sue the government for tracking e-mail and phone calls.

  • Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Contrary to popular belief, the Iowa caucuses are not a part of the state populated by Georgians, Armenians, and Azerbaijanis. Sorry, bad pun. (See Caucasus, a region of Eurasia.) But there is some confusion about what the Iowa caucuses are, exactly. So in a few easy steps, let us explain what will happen in the Hawkeye State the evening of Jan. 3 – the first presidential nominating contest of the season.

  • Why Mitt Romney isn't balking at strong voter support for Ron Paul

    Why Mitt Romney isn't balking at strong voter support for Ron Paul

    Presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Ron Paul are in the top two slots in both Iowa and New Hampshire. But there’s little doubt about who would win in a Romney-Paul matchup.

  •  'Racist newsletter' timeline: What Ron Paul has said

    'Racist newsletter' timeline: What Ron Paul has said

    Ron Paul has had to explain racially charged statements and other controversial comments in newsletters published in his name in the 1980s and 1990s. Here's what he's said over the years.

  • Gulf oil spill could result in criminal charges for BP employees

    Gulf oil spill could result in criminal charges for BP employees

    The Wall Street Journal reports that federal prosecutors are targeting several Houston-based engineers and at least one supervisor employed by British oil giant BP connected to the 2010 Gulf oil spill.

  • US weapons sales to Iraq: Still a good idea as violence escalates?

    US weapons sales to Iraq: Still a good idea as violence escalates?

    The 150 uniformed US troops still in Iraq are there to facilitate weapons sales and train Iraqi forces to use the armaments. But as violence rises in Iraq since the US military pullout, some analysts see greater risks that US-supplied weapons may be misused.

  • With 2012, state laws kick in on everything from immigration to shark fins

    With 2012, state laws kick in on everything from immigration to shark fins

    State legislatures passed close to 40,000 new laws in 2011, and a number of those measures take effect on Jan. 1. On some issues, like immigration, state laws are taking markedly different stands.

  • A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    There’s nothing like a presidential campaign cycle to bring out big political gaffes – at times injecting doubt about candidates, but also offering some much-needed comic relief and glimpses of humanity. 2011 had some doozies, and some of the most memorable actually weren’t on the campaign trail. GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann, who said the “shot heard round the world” was fired in New Hampshire (correct answer: Massachusetts), nailed the politicians’ dilemma perfectly: "People can make mistakes, and I wish I could be perfect every time I say something, but I can't." Here are five of the biggest political “uh-ohs” of 2011:

  • Breastfeeding moms protest at Target stores, but US public is real mark

    Breastfeeding moms protest at Target stores, but US public is real mark

    Lingering discomfort over public breastfeeding is responsible, in part, for curtailing moms' enthusiasm and driving down breastfeeding rates, research shows. Nurse-ins Wednesday at Target stores drew attention to the cause.

  • Was 2011 a good year? More Democrats than Republicans say 'yes.'

    Was 2011 a good year? More Democrats than Republicans say 'yes.'

    New AP-GfK poll finds a marked difference in how Republicans and Democrats view 2011 and prospects for 2012. Moreover, three-quarters of Democrats say Obama will be reelected, while three-quarters of Republicans say he won't.