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Will Beyonce's 'Lemonade' dominate at Grammy Awards?

Artists including John Legend and Carrie Underwood will perform at the 2017 Grammy Awards ceremony, for which Beyonce has received the most nominations following the release of her 2016 critically acclaimed album 'Lemonade.'

Beyonce Knowles arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards at Madison Square Garden in New York on Aug. 28, 2016.
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Artists including John Legend and Carrie Underwood are set to take the stage for the upcoming Grammy Awards ceremony, where singer Beyonce could dominate with her hit 2016 album “Lemonade.”

Mr. Legend, Ms. Underwood, Metallica, and Keith Urban are all set to perform at the Grammys ceremony, which will take place on Feb. 12. 

Beyonce has received the most Grammy nominations of any artist this year, with The Recording Academy bestowing nine on the “Formation” singer. Rihanna, Kanye West, and Drake follow behind, with each having gotten eight nods.

Beyonce achieved the feat of being the most-nominated artist this year by releasing the album “Lemonade,” which came out last April. The work is nominated for album of the year, while her song “Formation,” which appears on the album, is nominated for record of the year. Other nominations received by the singer include song of the year (also for “Formation”), best pop solo performance (for the song “Hold Up”), and best urban contemporary album, for “Lemonade." 

“Lemonade” was viewed by critics as an impressive achievement when it was released. An hour-long “Lemonade” film aired on HBO as well. 

Telegraph writer Jonathan Bernstein called “Lemonade” “by far Beyonce’s strongest album,” while Chicago Tribune writer Greg Kot found that it “contains singer’s most fully realized music yet … the artist’s most accomplished and cohesive work yet.… ‘Lemonade’ is more than just a play for pop supremacy. It’s the work of an artist who is trying to get to know herself better, for better or worse, and letting the listeners/viewers in on the sometimes brutal self-interrogation.”

Meanwhile, NME writer Larry Bartleet thought that “where her huge team fails to innovate is on the album’s drab middle few cuts about acceptance and forgiveness” but that overall, “the final four tracks see quality return, and penultimate track ‘All Night,’ in particular, is one of Beyoncé’s most nuanced vocal performances to date.”