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Black-eyed pea and collard gumbo

Also known as "Good Luck Gumbo," this hearty dish served over rice combines black-eyed peas and collard greens, both considered to bring New Year prosperity.

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    This Southern gumbo combines collard greens and black-eyed for a good luck tradition on New Year's Day.
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I am not an overly suspicious person. Sure, I have my little quirks, but I don’t worry about black cats, walking under ladders, throwing spilled salt over my left shoulder. But there are a few traditions that I adhere to because, well, it can’t hurt. Particularly if that tradition involves delicious food. So on New Year’s Day, I always eat black-eyed peas and greens. For luck and prosperity. Sometimes I eat them separately, but this gumbo includes all the ingredients for a good year.

This recipe has the traditional ingredients of good-luck Hoppin’ John (rice and black-eyed peas), which is another New Year tradition in the South, plus greens for prosperity. Here’s a little more information on Southern luck traditions.

This gumbo can be made the day before and reheated, which is a boon if you have been out all night celebrating. Just reheat, cook some rice, and add the collards. I highly recommend using smoked ham hock stock. It really gives the gumbo a smoky, earthy, rich flavor. Making it in the slow-cooker is a breeze, and you can do it ahead of time. If you can’t manage, look for ham stock at some grocery stores, or use the combo of chicken and beef.

Recommended: 8 ways to make black-eyed peas for New Year's Day

Good Luck Gumbo
Serves 6 to 8

1 pound smoked sausage, such as kielbasa
2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
1 onion
1 green pepper
4 stalks celery
1 tablespoon flour
1 teaspoon Creole seasoning (I use Tony Chachere’s)
6 cups ham hock stock*, or 4 cups chicken stock and 2 cups beef stock
1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 lb. black-eyed peas, fresh or frozen and thawed
1-1/2 cups long grain white rice
3-1/2 cups water
Collard leaves

1. Cut the smoked sausage into bite-size cubes. Heat the oil in a 5-quart Dutch oven, add the sausage and cook over medium high heat until the sausage begins to brown.

2. Finely chop the onion, seeded bell pepper and celery. I do this in a small food processor, one vegetable at a time, pulsing to chop the vegetable finely. Add the “trinity” vegetables to the pot and stir. Cover the pot and cook for 5 minutes to soften the vegetables, then remove the cover, stir well and cook until everything is nice and soft and any liquid has evaporated.

3. Stir in the flour and cook a further minute, then stir in the Creole seasoning. Pour in the stock and the canned tomatoes with their juice. Bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes uncovered, reduce to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes.

4. Add the black-eyed peas and continue cooking for another half an hour. The gumbo should reduce and thicken slightly. The gumbo can be made up to this point, cooled and refrigerated, covered, overnight.

5. When ready to serve, cook the rice. Stir the rice into the water in a large saucepan with a tight-fitting lid. Bring to a boil and boil until almost all the water is absorbed and little air bubbles form in the rice, about 10 to 12 minutes, stirring a few times to prevent sticking. Remove from the heat and tightly cover the pan.

6. Cut the collard leaves in half and cut out the stems. Stack the leaf halves, three at a time, on top of each other and roll up like a cigar. Cut the leaves into thin ribbons. You can further chop the collard ribbons if you’d like.

7. Heat the gumbo to a low boil over medium high heat. It will thicken as it sits, but loosen up when heated. But add a little water if you need to get things moving. Add the collards, stir, and cover the pot. Cook until the collards are tender and wilted, about 5 minutes. Serve over cooked rice. If you have saved some ham hock meat from making the stock, dice that and stir it into the gumbo as well. And if you’d like, sprinkle some hot sauce over the gumbo.

*Smoked Ham Hock Stock

Hock Stock is an amazing cooking medium for field peas, beans and greens, as well as a great base for soup or gumbo. I always look for a naturally smoked hock (not one that has no artificial smoke flavoring added). I get these from farmers’ market vendors when I can, and make a batch of stock to freeze. I then can have the long, slow-cooked taste in quick versions of my favorite Southern dishes.

1 large smoked ham hock, cut into three pieces
1 onion
2 carrots
2 celery stalks
1 tablespoon black pepper corns
3 bay leaves

1. Place all the ingredients in the crock of a large slow cooker. Add 10 – 12 cups of water to fill the crock. Cook on the low setting for 10 – 12 hours.

2. Strain the solids from the stock and refrigerate for several hours. When the stock is cold, skim any solidified fat from the top and discard. Strain the stock through cheesecloth to remove any last bits of debris.

3. If you’d like, pull the meat from the ham hock pieces and dice. It is a great addition to any soup or beans you are cooking with the stock.

4. The stock will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week or can be frozen for up to a year. The same goes for the hock meat, in a separate container from the stock.

Related post on The Runaway Spoon: Black-Eyed Pea and Cornbread Skillet

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

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