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Halloween party treat: Mexican mummy dogs

Everyone loves Halloween party tricks. Spice up your spread with a simple and inexpensive treat – hot dogs wrapped in tortilla strips.

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    Halloween parties are more fun with themed treats. Mexican mummy dogs are simple to make and can be put together in less time than it takes to heat an oven.
    A Palatable Pastime
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You may have seen the kind of mummy dogs made with packaged crescent rolls, which can be really high in fat, and much more doughy than crispy. These Mexican mummy dogs are simple to make, can be very low in fat or even fat free if you wish, and can be put together in less time than it takes to heat an oven.

I use the largest flour tortillas I can get to make longer strips – you can use smaller tortillas if you need to, but using bigger tortillas just makes the wrapping easier.

Mexican mummy dogs

Recommended: 13 Halloween treats

8 all-beef precooked hot dogs
2 extra-large burrito size soft flour tortillas or 4-6 very fresh corn or flour tortillas
1/2 cup canned refried beans
2 tablespoons butter
Salsa or nacho cheese dip (optional)
8 6-inch wooden skewers (optional)

1. Lay out a tortilla and spread refried beans all over one side in a thin layer.

2. Use a pizza cutter to cut tortilla in thin strips to make the “bandages.”

3. Pick up a strip and press on the hot dog, bean side facing the hot dog, and wind it around like a mummy, pressing firmly. Repeat with other hot dogs. Don’t worry if they are slightly messy. After they brown in the pan you won’t really notice it.

4. Heat butter in a non-stick skillet and brown hot dogs on all sides until crisp, turning gently. (If a piece of bandage comes loose, use a little bit of beans to stick it back down, like glue.)

5. Carefully insert a wooden skewer into one end.

6. Serve mummy dogs with salsa or warm nacho cheese dip.

For photos of the steps, go to: A Palatable Pastime

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

 
 
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