Coconut scones

Made with coconut oil, grated coconut, and dusted with cinnamon sugar, these scones are just the right amount of sweet.

By , Tates Like Home

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    Coconut oil can be used like butter in baking, such as for these coconut scones, if you follow a few basic steps.
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Lately I have been testing various recipes using coconut oil made by a small Guyanese farmer here in Barbados and the results have been truly delicious. The textures and flavors of the baked goods have been outstanding. So far I've used the coconut oil to make pastries – sweet and savory and one of my all-time favorite things, scones.

I start by pouring the freshly made,freshly bought coconut oil into a container and refrigerating it overnight. In no time, it is rock solid, harder than very cold butter. It is from this stage that I chop off (too hard to cut) what I need, weigh, and then go to work. I simply replace the hardened/solid coconut oil in place of butter, ounce for ounce.

These coconut scones are not only made with coconut oil but also freshly grated coconut. It has the right amount of sweetness and the cinnamon sugar coating creates a delicate crust.

Recommended: Five breakfast meals to go

Coconut scones
Yields 8

It is very important that you read all the notes below before attempting this recipe.
 
For dough 

2 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for work surface

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3 tablespoons white sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt (a pinch)

1 cup freshly grated coconut, cold

4 ounces cold, hardened coconut oil, chopped into pieces

3/4 cup cold whole milk
 
For topping 

1/4 cold whole milk

2 tablespoons castor sugar

3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

2. Shift the flour and add it to the bowl of a food processor along with the baking powder, cinnamon, sugar and salt. Pulse a few times to mix well.

3. Add coconut and pulse to mix.

4. Add hardened coconut oil and pulse until the mixture is coarse.

5. With the processor running, pour in the milk. Open the cover and test the dough by gathering a little of it with your fingers, if it comes together, it is done, if not, replace the cover and add a little more milk until it can come together easily. Do not overwork the dough. It is supposed to be a little crumbly but not dry.

6. Flour a work surface and turn out the contents of the bowl onto the surface. Flour your hands and bring to dough together patting it into a thick 6-inch disk.

7. Carefully transfer the disk to the lined baking sheet and put in the freezer for 15 to 20 minutes or until hardened (longer if in refrigerator). Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F., and mix together the cinnamon and sugar for the topping and set aside.

8. Remove the pan from the freezer/refrigerator, cut into dough into wedges. Brush with milk and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.

9. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until scones and brown and the top crusty.

10. Rest in pan for 5 minutes then transfer to a wire rack to cool. Serve warm.

Notes

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

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