Red velvet sandwich cookies

Did you know Valentine's Day is also the start of red velvet season? Make a cute and trendy dessert for your sweetheart with these sandwich cookies with heart-shaped cutouts. 

By , Whipped, The Blog

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    Show your love this Valentine's with these red velvet sandwich cookies.
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Red velvet is today’s culinary “it” girl. There are dozens of dedicated Pinterest boards, devoted red velvet enthusiasts, and concoctions of all forms. I think red velvet, the old Southern favorite, is at top of its bell curve. If you aren’t a fan, you may be rolling your eyes at every pancake recipe or cake pop. But, if you are like me, you are relishing in the light of its fame. I’m no fair-weather fan – I pledged my love years ago and I will be faithful when red velvet tips over the top of this roller coaster and lands on the “out” lists. 

I used to recognize Valentine’s Day as the commercial holiday it is. As a kid, I enjoyed candy hearts as much as the next sugar fiend but as I matured, I never required my love interests to make a big deal of the holiday. However, 16 years ago, I met my husband on Valentine’s Day and the day took on a more real meaning.

Fourteen years later, our second daughter (lovingly known as Baby Whipped) was born on Valentine’s Day. This year, as she approaches her second birthday, I’ve got the Valentine’s fever. Hearts, candies, gifts, special dinners, sappy sentiments… BRING it on. My heart is bursting.

Recommended: 14 sweet recipes for Valentine's Day

This year, we decided to try a new red velvet recipe. These sandwich cookies were chosen in part so I could employ my favorite Linzer cookie cutter. The method of spreading out the batter is a little fussy. But, we loved the flavor of the cookies and the consistency. For almost a week, they lived on our counter in an air tight container and stayed soft.

Red velvet sandwich cookies
From Krissy’s Creations recipe

1 cup all purpose flour

2 tablespoon cocoa powder

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature

3 tablespoon milk

1 tablespoon red food coloring

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon baking soda

2-inch round cookie cutter

For the cream filling:

1/2 cup shortening

1/2 cup butter

2 cups confectioners sugar

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Add the butter and milk and beat until incorporated. Mix in the red food coloring. Combine the vinegar and baking soda in a small bowl, and then mix into the batter.

Transfer the batter to a sheet pan lined with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Using an offset spatula spread the batter until it reaches the edges of the pan and has evened out. Bake the large cookie until it has set, about 12-14 minutes. The edges make be crunchy but the center will spring back to your touch. Remove from the oven and let cool until its warm.

While the cookie is cooling, make the cream filling. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the shortening and butter. Add the confectioners sugar and beat until smooth and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Mix in the vanilla.

Transfer the filling to a piping bag filled with a large round tip.

When the cookie is just slightly warm, carefully transfer the large cookie to a clean surface. Using a 2-inch round cookie cutter cut out the cookies leaving as little scraps as possible. Place the cookies in pairs, side-by-side. Pipe small rounds of cream filling on one cookie of each pair, top with the other cookie. Serve and enjoy!

These cookies last up to six days in a sealed container.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

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