Curried fig butter biscuits

Serve these buttery sweet rolls with a spicy soup or stew.

By , Beyond The Peel

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    Dinner rolls made with yogurt and sweetened with curried fig butter stay moist for days.
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I made this gnocchi last week and I have to say the highlight was the curried fig butter. But now what? I had a little left and it was too good to let it go to waste.  I needed to make a real dent in it. So, yesterday afternoon I decided to make a vegetable tagine (stay tuned!) I had been dreaming about, and out of no where the most amazing idea came to me. Like angels singing from above! It was magical!

Cinnamon rolls made with curried fig butter (sans sugar of course). Now, that was a good idea. But I didn’t want to fuss with yeast and regular bread dough but I had a better idea! I found a recipe for yogurt biscuits years ago (sorry I can’t quote a source because it was hand written in my little cookbook so very long ago) and they’ve been a household favorite ever since. I suspect it’s the yogurt that really sets these biscuits apart. They stay moist and light for days, unlike it’s buttermilk counterpart that typically are only good the day they are made.

I pulled one of these out of the fridge today to eat with leftovers and it was still just as moist and light as yesterday. I love this biscuit recipe!

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Curried Fig Butter Biscuit Rolls

2 cups sprouted spelt flour (but any flour works)
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup oil of choice (I used olive oil)
1 cup full fat yogurt (I used 6%)
Curried fig butter*
Cinnamon, to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Prepare curried fig butter (recipe below). Set aside.

In a large bowl, mix dry ingredients together. Add oil and yogurt. Mix until just combined.

On a well-floured surface, roll out the dough in a rectangular shape to 1/2-inch thick. Spread soften curried fig butter over the surface of the dough, leaving the last 1-1/2 inches on the long side, unbuttered. Sprinkle with cinnamon.

Roll the dough into a log. Pinch the dough to seal up the opening and prevent it from unrolling. Cut into 1-1/2 inch wide slices. I was able to get about 10 slices from the dough. Place individual slices in individual muffin tins. Bake for 12 -15 minutes until light golden brown.

Serve warm with a spicy soup or stew.

Note: You can use this dough recipe to make regular biscuits. Roll out to a half an inch thick and cut into biscuit shape. I use a small glass dipped in flour to make nice 1-1/2 inch wide biscuits. You should get around a dozen biscuits per batch.

*Curried Fig Butter

5 dried figs (soaked in hot water for 10 minutes)
 1/4 cup butter, room temperature
 1/2 teaspoon of curry powder (I used Garam Masala)
 1 tablespoon lemon zest or finely chopped preserved lemon peel

Note: If using unsalted butter, you may want to add a 1/2 tsp of salt to the butter.

Soak the dried figs in hot water until they soften. Drain off the water and remove the stem. Add all the remaining ingredients to a food processor or blender and puree until well combined. Season with salt. Add extra curry and lemon according to taste.

Related posts: Kabocha Squash Gnocchi with Curried Fig Butter, How to Preserve Meyer Lemons

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