Three ways to grill steaks

Loin flap steaks, flat steaks, and top sirloin are less expensive cuts that deliver delicious flavors.

By , Three Many Cooks

  • close
    Grilled steaks and corn on the cob sit on a barbeque and release delicious aromas into the air.
    View Caption

For summer grilling many of us naturally reach for the pricey steaks – strips, rib-eyes, filet mignons – but they aren’t the only cuts in the case. In this week’s USA Weekend video we introduce you to our favorite less expensive steaks.

Beef loin flap steaks resemble boneless ribs. They’re full of flavor and take well to spice rubs. Thin steaks like flank, skirt, and flatiron are perfect candidates for marinades. Thicker top sirloin is wonderfully beefy. Just grill it as you would one of the pricier steaks and smear it with the horseradish parsley butter. Using moist peppery parsley and horseradish means you need very little butter to bind it.

Fire up your grill this July 4th! And enjoy a steak…and the long weekend!

Spice-Rubbed Grilled Beef Loin Flap Steaks
Serves 6

2 teaspoons each: kosher salt, coarsely ground black pepper, garlic powder, paprika and ground cumin and coriander
2 pounds beef loin flap steaks
1 tablespoon olive oil

Mix salt, pepper, garlic powder, cumin, coriander, and paprika. Rub steak with oil and pat on spice mixture; let stand while grill is heating or up to 2 hours. (Can be refrigerated overnight; return to room temperature.)

Heat gas grill igniting all burners on high for at least 10 minutes or build a hot charcoal fire. Clean grate with a wire brush and then lubricate with an oil-soaked rag. Add steaks, close lid, and grill, turning only once, to desired doneness, about 3 minutes per side for medium-rare and 3 ½ minutes per side for medium. Let rest for 5 minutes and serve, making sure everyone knows to slice the steak against the grain.

Grilled Marinated Flat Steak
Serves 6

2 tablespoon each olive oil, balsamic vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and soy sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1-1/2 pounds thin, flat steak, such as flank, skirt or flatiron

Mix oil, vinegar, Worcestershire and soy sauces, mustard and garlic powder; pour into a gallon-size zipper-lock bag, along with steak and let marinate for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours. (Can be refrigerated overnight; return to room temperature.)

Heat gas grill igniting all burners on high for at least 10 minutes or build a hot charcoal fire. Clean grate with a wire brush and then lubricate with an oil-soaked rag. Add steak, close lid and grill, turning only once, to desired doneness, 3 ½ minutes for medium-rare and about 4 minute per side for medium. Let rest for 5 minutes. Slice thin and serve.

Grilled Top Sirloin with Horseradish-Parsley Butter
Serves 6

2 top sirloin steaks, a generous 1-inch thick (about 2 pounds)
2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus a pinch for the butter
1 tablespoons olive oil
4 teaspoons ground black pepper, plus extra for butter
1/3 cup bottled horseradish, lightly squeezed of excess liquid
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
3 tablespoons softened unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Sprinkle both sides of steak with salt and let stand for 1 to 2 hours. Wipe off excess salt and moisture then rub with oil and sprinkle with pepper. Make horseradish butter by mixing horseradish, parsley, butter, rice vinegar, a pinch of salt and a few grinds of pepper; set aside.

Heat gas grill igniting all burners on high for at least 10 minutes or build a hot charcoal fire. Clean grate with a wire brush then lubricate with an oil-soaked rag. When ready to grill steaks, sprinkle very lightly with sugar (to enhance grill marks). Add steaks, close lid and grill, turning only once, to desired doneness, about 4 minutes per side for medium-rare and about 5 minute per side for medium. Remove from grill and let rest for 5 minutes. Slice thin, smearing each portion of steak with a little of the flavored butter. Serve.

Pam Anderson blogs with her two daughters at Three Many Cooks.

Do you have a favorite summer salad? Enter the Stir It Up! "Summer Salad Recipe Contest" and win the chance to share it with our readers! Click here for more information on how to submit your recipe.

--------------------------------------------------------------
The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

Share this story:

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...