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Classic cream scones

British scones, unlike their American counterparts, are small, round, and perfect.

(Page 2 of 2)



Classic Cream Scones
From "Simply Scones" by Leslie Weiner and Barbara Albright
Makes about 14 scones

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The Pastry Chef’s Baking

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2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup unsalted butter, chilled
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 large egg
1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup currants, optional
1 egg mixed with
1 teaspoon water for glaze, optional

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly butter a baking sheet.

In a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut the butter into ½-inch cubes and distribute them over the flour mixture. With a pastry blender or two knives used scissor fashion, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. In a small bowl, stir together the cream, egg and vanilla. Add the cream mixture to the flour mixture and stir until combined. Stir in the currants, if desired.

With lightly floured hands, pat the dough into a 1/2-inch thickness on a lightly floured cutting board. Using a floured 2-1/2-inch diameter round biscuit cutter or a glass, cut out rounds from the dough and place them on the prepared baking sheet. Gather scraps together and repeat until all the dough is used. ightly brush tops of the scones with the egg mixture, if desired. Bake for 13 to 15 minutes, or until lightly browned.4

Remove the baking sheet to a wire rack and cool for 5 minutes. Using a spatula, transfer the scones to the wire rack to cool. Serve warm or cool completely and store in an airtight container.

Carol Ramos blogs at The Pastry Chef's Baking.

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